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Emmett Till Murder

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Emmett Till Murder
“#BlackLivesMatter” is an expanding movement that fights for freedom and justice for all black lives. It started in 2012, after Trayvon Martin was killed by George Zimmerman while walking unarmed in his neighborhood. Zimmerman was later acquitted of all charges. This create a nationwide outrage in which the public felt that there was a total disregard for blacks basic human rights and dignity. This tragedy is just as similar to the murder of Emmett Till in 1955. Till was kidnapped and murdered after whistling at a white woman. The life and murder of Emmett Till as well as the court ruling of his murder later sparked an outrage that pushed for African-American Civil Rights.

Emmett Louis "Bobo" Till was born on July 25th 1941 in Chicago's Cook
…show more content…
Although his mother was originally reluctant, she eventually allowed him to go not knowing that she would never see him alive again. Three days after arriving in Money, Mississippi on August 24th, 1955, Till and a few others entered Bryant’s Grocery and Meat Market to buy refreshments after picking cotton in the sun. Bryant’s Grocery and Meat Market was owned by Roy Bryant and his wife Carolyn Bryant also worked there. While in the store, Till purchased bubble gum. What happens after that is unclear. Some witnesses report that Till whistled and said “bye, baby” to Carolyn Bryant. Other witnesses suggest that Till placed the money in Bryant’s hand instead of putting it on the counter Offended by Till’s actions, Bryant informs her husband about the events that transpired in the store while he was away claiming she was …show more content…
According to the LA Times, In Chicago, “more than 20,000 people protested after the acquittal along with another 10,000 in Harlem.” Many people who were on the sidelines during the Civil right movement wanted to join the fight for equal rights. One hundred days after the Emmett Till’s murder, Rosa Parks refused to give seat while on an Alabama bus on her way home. That soon sparked the Montgomery Bus boycott led by Martin Luther King lasting 381 days. Nine years later, congress passed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, banning racial discrimination and

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