Emerson And Prose

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Education has always been changing, and evolving, and throughout time there has been people who fight to change it; people like Emerson and Prose. Both had unique views and opinions about education and constructed arguments tailored to their ideals. To support these arguments they used many rhetorical devices such as, logos, ethos, juxtaposition,and rhetorical questions. Both Emerson and Prose thought that the education system should change, and they each needed to present their argument in a way that would persuade the reader to cohere to their ideas. This could be accomplished by the use of logos, pathos, or ethos. Emerson and Prose used all three devices numerous times throughout their works. However, Emerson has a more logical argument, while Prose has a more ethical argument. As Emerson starts his essay and begins to build his argument, he tries to make use of a logical example in the fourth paragraph by inserting an anecdote about a man he met in …show more content…
These rhetorical questions are used to force the reader to think of the obvious answer. Prose uses many rhetorical questions such as “Where do students learn to write stale, inaccurate similes?” and “Who seriously believes that murky,turgid, convoluted language of this sort constitutes as good writing?” This calls into question the education system and what types of information they are teaching to students. Emerson also uses many rhetorical questions in his work, such as “What abiding Hope can it inspire?” and “ What poet will it breed to sing to the human race?”

Emerson and Prose have different views about what education should be and what it should accomplish. And both Emerson and Prose use many rhetorical devices in their works, the main ones being, logos, ethos, juxtaposition, and rhetorical questions. These devices help to support their argument about the inferior methods of teaching and why they should be

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