Electronic Medical Records

Where’s My Chart?
Ametra Heard
HCA417: Electronic Medical Records
Instructor Karen Bakuzonis
June 9, 2014

Where’s My Chart?
The changes in medical records have altered tremendously over the past decade. The most significant change was the merging of paper medical records to electronic medical records. However, there is still room for necessary improvement and upgrades. Electronic Medical Records are thought to improve certain areas in the deliverance of healthcare services. With current situations, not all healthcare facilities have converted to or adopted the use of Electronic Medical Records. The failure to adopt or convert to Electronic Medical Records brings about incidents and stories similar to that of the real-life story of “Where’s My Chart?” written in the textbook entitled Electronic Medical Records by Richard Gartee. The prominent answer to “Where’s My Chart?” is the adoption and implementation of Electronic Medical Records and the reason to of security why healthcare facilities lags behind other industries in healthcare.
A similar story to “Where’s My Chart?” is one that I encountered several years ago. As I moved from a smaller city to a somewhat larger city, than the one I was previously located, I was in search of a primary care doctor to take over my life threatening medical condition. I called to my previous residential city and asked the physician office and hospital to mail or send my medical history to my current physician in the city in which I lived. In disbelief of “where’s my chart?” as I asked myself and the medical transcriptionist. I learned that the healthcare facility only kept paper records for 5 years, and I was not hospitalized in that healthcare facility at least 10 years. It is necessary to say that at that healthcare facility I did not have a chart or any records at all. To further locate my chart at the previous physician office, I came across the same scenario, except that they did have my records stored on



References: Cochran, John. (Spring 2009). Investing in Health IT: A Stimulus for a Healthier America. The Permanente Journal, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 65-70. Published online Spring 2009. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3034435/ Gabriel, M. H., Furukawa, M. F., Jones, E. B., King J., Samy, L. K. (2013 September). The Implementation and Use of Electronic Health Records to Achieve Meaningful Use and Critical Access Hospitals. ONC Data Brief, No. 12. Washington, DC: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. Retrieved from http://www.healthit.gov/sites/default/files/cahdata_brief12.pdf Holdren, J. P., Lander, E., Varmus, H., and et al. (2010 December). Report to the President Realizing the Full Potential of Health Information Technology To Improve Healthcare for Americans: The Path Forward. Executive Office of the President, Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. Retrieved from: http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/pcast-health-it-report.pdf

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