Effects Of Grizzly Bears

Good Essays
Grizzly bears of North America have huge cultural significance on native American and European heritage (Kellert, 1994). Indigenous cultures revered these majestic species, its example can be seen in art and literature and Europeans settlers appreciated them for their economic values (Kellert et al., 1996). However, as our society evolved, we became distant from nature and “reverence for the bear was replaced with fear, exploitation, and subordination” (Kellert et al., 1996). Modern culture holds negative perception of them and one of the prime reason for that is the conflict experienced between humans and Grizzly bears. Human-Wildlife conflict, per the proceedings from International Union for the Conservation of Nature World Parks, occurs …show more content…
Parks Canada provides an estimate of 20,000 Grizzly bears in Canada (regions included: British Columbia, Western Alberta, the Yukon and North Western Territories) (2014). But, a recent study by Sawaya et al. (2012) has suggested that Grizzly Population is already in decline in some parts of Canada such as Banff National Park and the numbers presented by Government of Canada are lower than the reality. Furthermore, The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada cites them as species of special concern (2012). Amid all this, conflicts with humans can make this situation even worse as they can induce human caused mortality of Grizzly bears. Stakeholders have taken actions and measures to address the issue of Human – Grizzly bear conflict; however, no compelling results have been seen so far. Some actions such as aversive conditioning and hunting ends up hurting the population further; thus, contradicting the inherent nature of both conservation biology and animal welfare science. It is evident that Grizzly bear – Human conflict causes significant harm to the animals, and actions taken to resolve this issue are proving to be ineffective. Therefore, for successful results a paradigm shift must be undertaken to focus on conservation and welfare equally. The objective of this paper is to examine the causes and the impacts of the Human – Grizzly bear conflict and management actions taken to resolve it. Furthermore, analyze the implications of the actions in terms of conservation and welfare of Grizzly bears and determine the common goals between conservation biology and animal welfare science regarding the conflict issue and provide alternative suggestion based on the goals and scientific

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Satisfactory Essays

    Outland, K. (2008). Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf? The Yellowstone Wolves Controversy. The Journal of Young Investigators. Retrieved on February 14, 2010 from: http://www.jyi.org/features/ft.php?id=431…

    • 532 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    “ 61 people have been killed by black bears while hundreds of black bears have been killed by hunters in New Jersey” Does the bear hunt really matter that much? The bear hunt isn’t necessary, and some people may not believe this but it doesn’t change anything. The bears will just keep on growing so why should we murder them for no reason while there are other ways to prevent them from hurting our people. Hunting black bears is a horrendous sport which lets hunters get lots of money for doing something wrong. When has murdering and torturing animals become a sport? What have the bears ever done to us or the hunters? They kill people because they are terrified of us. It is not their fault. When people are terrified they do the same thing. We should end the bear hunt because when we hurt bears that is…

    • 940 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    In the 1940s ecologist Aldo Leopold penned his now famous essay “Thinking like a Mountain.” In his youth Leopold killed a wolf, but with reflection and wisdom that comes with age, he realized that wolves played a critical role in the interaction between prey species like deer and elk and plant communities. After seeing how too many deer and elk can strip a mountain of its vegetation, Leopold lamented that we needed to learn to think like a mountain — in other words, have a long-term view of the ecological role and value of predators.…

    • 150 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    In the time we live in today we still struggle with the issue of wildlife conservation. Wildlife conservation is important, as animals can not speak for the selves and need us to create a voice for them. Former United States President Jimmy Carter has a strong opinion towards wildlife conservation shown in a foreword to Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Seasons of Life and Land. In the foreword by Jimmy Carter, he uses effective rhetorical devices in his argument to persuade his audience that the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge should not be developed for industry.…

    • 788 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Laundre, J.W., Hernandez, L., and Altendorf, K.B. 2001. Wolves, elk, and bison: reestablishing the “landscape of fear” in Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A. Canadian Journal of Zoology/Revue Canadienne de Zoologie 79.8: 1401-1409.…

    • 2652 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Cited: John W. Duffield, Chris J. Neher, and David A. Patterson. "Wolf Recovery in Yellowstone: Park Visitor Attitudes,Expenditures and Economic Impact." The George Wright Forum (2008): 17.…

    • 2517 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Jim Robbins wrote “America's Gray Ghosts: The Disappearing Caribou” for The New York Times in order to raise the issue of struggling caribou populations in North America and encourage a government response. Robbin advocates for the protection of caribou by referencing experts on the topic in order to establish his authority and statistics that support his argument on a logical level.…

    • 478 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Hunting and Wolves

    • 1830 Words
    • 8 Pages

    Matsuoka, Rachel. "The Environment & Wildlife Cause." Western States Killing Wolves By the Hundreds. Care 2, 21 Dec. 2011. Web. 15 Oct. 2012.…

    • 1830 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Kristof vs. Bambi

    • 987 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The purpose of “For Environmental Balance, Pick Up a Rifle” by Nicholas D. Kristof is to inform the reader that deer are causing death and destruction all across America and to persuade the reader to believe the only way to end this is to hunt deer. Kristof begins the essay by grabbing our attention proving deer are over populated, destroying the ecosystem, and killing Americans in car crashes every year. He then leads us to his thesis “Let’s bring back hunting.” Kristof notes that these days many people view hunting as cruel and brutal and are opting for other methods for deer control now due to their sympathy for deer. He believes methods such as birth control are a waste of time and money and if something does not change soon it is only going to get worse. Kristof also proves in his essay that there has been a significant decline of hunting stating, “For every hundred hunters who die or stop hunting, only sixty-nine hunters take their place” (pg.183). He wants us to know while you can be sympathetic to the deer we have an environmental imbalance, a serious problem and the only way to solve it is to put feelings aside and hunt. Kristof then offers us another way to look at hunting. That it is environmentally friendly. He even goes on to say, “It connects people with the outdoors and creates a broader constituency for wilderness prevention” and makes sure to note “At a time when America is goggled away with logging, mining, or oil drilling” (pg. 183), which touches the hearts of environmentalists. Kristof gives us two options in this essay:…

    • 987 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Test 15

    • 1409 Words
    • 6 Pages

    One way to control herd sizes in national parks is the reintroduction of predators, but this course is opposed by…

    • 1409 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Farley, Mowat’s “Never cry wolf,” is a book based on the research of the lifestyle of wolves in the Arctic Circle. Mowat uses his experience to educate the society of the social ills conducted by the hunters towards the wolves. The book displays the risk that the wolf pack families face due to the human activities in the area. The title of the book acts as a symbol in reference to the story of the boy who cried wolf. The book thus enables the reader to think beyond the tile so as to form an opinion of the author’s message. The book challenges the human communities who are in charge of the nature around them. Humans tend to overstep their authority by infringing on the rights of the wolves. The analysis of the book educates the society of the inhumane activities that humans are inflicting on the animals. “The wolf is a savage, powerful killer. It is one of the most feared and hated animals known to man and with excellent reason” Chapter 6, pg. 60.…

    • 496 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    For quite a long time now an increased concern of wildlife has developed. This includes protection, conservation, global warming and the most important factor: our very own impact on the flora and fauna on this Earth.…

    • 2094 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Reintroduction of Wolves

    • 1054 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Smith, Douglas W., and Gary Ferguson. Decade of the wolf: returning the wild to Yellowstone. Guilford, Conn.: Lyons Press, 2005. Print.…

    • 1054 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Violence has become a major problem in modern-day society. Gruesome video games and certain entertainment shows such as pro-wrestling has been exposing violence to kids that later on wish to emulate these actions. These actions are then publicized to the world by violent acts toward other species and human beings. In his article, “An Elephant Crackup,” Charles Siebert depicts the violence that humans have done toward the elephant culture and how humans should put a stop to these acts and save elephants from extinction. With his strong defense on elephants, Siebert gives the reader a better understanding of the violence that is going on not only toward elephants and wildlife, but also toward modern-day civic life. Elephants are wild creatures just like humans and, therefore, both species must take care of one another to obtain a better and healthier society. With positive human action, both man and pachyderm can be raised with proper guidance, eliminating the violence that would put both species at risk.…

    • 708 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Grizzly Man Summary

    • 384 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The Grizzly Man is an odd person. He seems to care for the bears that are without a doubt. Is he helping or hurting the bears though? Well, we know that people know of his presence in bear country, and we know that they set out and look for him, sometimes finding him. We also know that he brings a lot of awareness to the bears and the conditions set on them. What is he trying to save them from specifically? Based on the part of the movie that I have seen, we never see him once mention the threats imposed on them, we never see the endangerment befalling the North American grizzly bear. Is he really educating people in too activism or is he just endorsing the idea of their majesty and gracefulness. He keeps speaking of how the bears might attack any moment, and he keep talking of how strong he has to be. So maybe this puts forth some resentment towards the bears. Although he really balances the scale in the end, he hurts the bear. He shoots his film as if it were for a documentary, but then sets out on a tour helping to spur people onto the idea that we need help for the bears. The combination of trying to shoot a documentary and trying to win people over to the idea that we need to help them rarely work out. On one hand, you are showing a video in which bears are killing, in which he talks of the danger of these bears, he speaks of their furiousness, their veracity; and on the other hand, you are trying to teach people that the bears themselves are in danger. Even though both statements are true, they almost work against people's emotions and ideas of what a grizzly bear really is. What he is doing would be an equivalent of salespersons teaching a customer all the features of a vacuum cleaner and then telling them not to buy it. They are two conflicting viewpoints, and they have trouble coexisting. This tends to lead to a lot more confusion about bears, and rather than the documentary answering questions about the bears in just creates more, and after all is taken…

    • 384 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays