educational laws

Topics: Discrimination, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, High school Pages: 5 (1580 words) Published: May 2, 2014
Educational laws and acts are required to protect the rights of students and employees in the school setting. Title VII, Pregnancy Discrimination Act, Age Discrimination in Employment Act, Title IX, Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, Equal Access Act, Civil Rights, Section 504 of Rehabilitation Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act are a few educational laws that will be discussed below.

Title VII prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex and national origin. The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination, investigation or lawsuit. The law also requires that employers reasonably accommodate applicant’s and employee’s sincerely held religious practices, unless doing so would impose and undue hardship on the operation of the employer’s business (U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, 2013). Title VII protects students and teachers from this kind of discrimination. Everyone is not the same color, race, sex or practices the same religion so there will have to be some kind of balance that will allow everyone to be accepted and this is the act that does so.

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act amended Title VII to make it illegal to discriminate against a woman because of pregnancy, childbirth or a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth. The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit (U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, 2013). This act is in place to protect women and women who want to have children. Women should not be afraid of not having job security when they decide to have a baby. Women have the right to decided whether or not they should be able to work and have a job not the potential employer.

The Age Discrimination in Employment Act protects people who are 40 or older from discrimination because of age. The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination or participated in employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit (U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, 2013). Age should not be a factor in hiring people for jobs pertaining to the school system or district if the person is still in sound mind. Many teachers are “seasoned veterans” by the age of 40 and are able to teach and respond to certain situations better than teachers that are fresh out of college.

The Title IX act prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in any federally funded education program or activity. The principle objective is to avoid the use of federal money to support sex discrimination in education programs and to provide individual citizens effective protection against those practices. Not only does Title IX apply to colleges, universities, elementary and secondary schools, it also applies to any education or training program operated by a recipient of federal financial assistance (US Department of Justice, 2013). Title IX is best known for its impact on school athletic programs. Title IX was renamed in October of 2002 as the Patsy Takemoto Mink Equal Opportunity in Education Act. This law act is needed to make sure that fairness is ensured between the sexes. Male and female sports have not always been equal. Women have always had to work hard to gain equal rights and opportunities for themselves. To determine fairness between the sexes, the Department of Education has developed a list of ten factors that must be fair between the sexes.

The Family and Education Rights and Privacy Act protect the privacy of students’ education records. This act applies to all schools that receive funds under an applicable program of the United States Department of...

References: NCLD Public Policy Team. (2013, 5 31). Section 504 of the Rehabilition Act of 1973. Retrieved from National Center for Learning Disabilities: http://www.ncld.org/disabilites-advocacy/learn-ld-laws/adaa-section-504/section-504-rehabilition-act-1973
U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. (2013, 5 28). US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Retrieved from http://ww.eeoc.gov/laws/statutes/index.cfm
US Department of Education. (2013, 5 30). Retrieved from Family Educational Right and Privacy Act (FERPA): http://www.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/index/html
US Department of Justice. (2013, 5 30). The United States Department of Justice. Retrieved from Title IX od the Education Amendments of 172: http://www.justice.gov/crt/about/cor/coord/titleix.php
Wikipedia. (2013, 5 31). Americans with Disabilites Act of 1990. Retrieved from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Americans_with_Disabilites_Act_or_1990
Wikipedia. (2013, 5 31). Civil Rights. Retrieved from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_Rights
Wikipedia. (2013, 5 30). Equal Access Act. Retrieved from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/equal_access_act
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