Eastern Plains Villagers

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The Incompatible Element: The Horse among the Eastern Plains Villagers In the Eastern Plains Villages, nearly everyone had horses that were supplied by Jumano and Comanche traders. The benefits were nearly irresistible, and they started using horses to hunt, make sudden attacks, and became middlemen in the food trade industry. However, they soon learned that horses would destroy cornfields and consume large amounts of the dwindling supply of cottonwood bark. Within the Eastern Plains there were many different equestrian cultures and ideals. The Mandans, Hidatsas, and Arikaras continued to focus on agriculture, suppressed nomadic tendencies, and preferred small scale hunts with a few horses per family. Some small scale villages did not bother …show more content…
This includes the high organization, large amount of size, supplies, and military administration. They had an ideal system and amount of horses to sidestep the ecological, economic, and military impact the other groups had. In the mid eighteenth century, horses were still uncommon, and the Lakotas were struggling to find bison. By the 1780’s they stole and bought enough horses to become more equestrian based, While they were mobile, diese nearly decimated villages, opening up land with more bison to the Lakotas. They continued to expand and dedicate themselves to nomadism, traveling and taking control of the Black Hills, creating an alliance with the Cheyennes and Arapahoes and assaulting other groups in order to gain power. The Lakotas dominated due to the growing population, sturdy allies, access to American markets, and an adaptive political system. They avoided Indian removal acts, and deadly diseases brought from Euro-Americans, and figured out how to manage the right amount of horses in order to dominate the Plains. The Lakotas were involved in the fur trade however unlike other areas their bison ecology stayed relatively the same for a while, and worsened at a lower rate than surrounding areas. The Northern Cheyennes, Lakotas, and the Northern Arapahoes were strong enough that the new Euro-American invaders had difficulty conquering them. The Lakota image has …show more content…
For one, Hämäläinen focuses on the Lakotas and their tribal successes. He even makes the claim that they dominated the Plains by resourceful utilization of their horses, and subsequently succeeded ecologically and economically. Conversely, Brinkley claimed the Sioux were the most potent group, due to their accordance in following the bison herds. Most importantly, Hämäläinen makes claims that the equestrian culture and the invasion of the American colonists caused the downfall of the Plains Indians whereas Brinkley only holds those who seized

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