Dystopian Society In Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

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Although the novel, “Brave New World”, encourages sexual intercourse, drug use, and opposes any form of family, and religion it should be kept in the high school curriculum because these are our worst features of our world drawn out and exaggerated, and humanity seems to be moving closer to Huxley’s dystopian vision.
Huxley’s literary work of “Brave New World” creates an almost reflective image with our world today. Many elements in his writing have an over whelming similarity to today’s society because our worst features are drawn out and exaggerated, but still based off the similar concepts and values. One feature that could be comparable with our society to that of the World State would be holding technology at religious standards. During the era of the novel, Henry Ford had just
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The reason the World State is against family and against religion is because they believe a family, participation in religion, or anything that allows personal thought may create unwanted problems. The overall goal for the World State is to create a society similar to a utopian society; however, they create the complete opposite not allowing anyone to expand their mind, completely controlling their life from beginning to end. Neither of these concepts is intended for the reader to become influence by them but instead only to convey the overall image.
The novel “Brave New World” should be kept in the high school curriculum because it creates concepts that are similarly based on today’s values. However, some may find it offensive due to some fragments of the literary work, and believe it should be banned from high school curriculum, but one is not intended to receive any misleading advice or become influenced based on the novels content. The novel provides a very vivid image of a dystopian society and that was Huxley’s intention and nothing

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