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Dyslexia And Cher's Battle Against It

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Dyslexia And Cher's Battle Against It
Dyslexia and Cher’s Battle Against it “Dyslexia is an impairment in the development of skilled reading and spelling,” said Nicola Brunswick, author of Living with Dyslexia (Brunswick 2). Singer and actress, Cher, is one of many people struggling with this disease. Cher’s battle with dyslexia may have given her trouble with school at a younger age and physically writing down the lyrics to her songs, but she coped with it the way you would expect a strong person like her to. There are multiple physical and mental symptoms experienced in a person with dyslexia. Some physical symptoms for pre-school children are delayed speech development, difficulty understanding and following simple, spoken directions, and difficulty learning new vocabulary. Physical symptoms for primary school children may be attempts to avoid reading out loud, stuttering when talking or a lack of confidence in …show more content…
In secondary school children people may see work with frequent spelling mistakes, and difficulty taking written notes. Lastly, some symptoms in adults are poor spelling, poor time management, and difficulty with planning and organization. Mental symptoms in people with dyslexia are relatively the same at all ages. A person with dyslexia at any age may experience low self esteem and sometimes depression (Brunswick 6-8). There are two different kinds of dyslexia. There is developmental dyslexia, which is developed from birth, and acquired dyslexia, which is caused by injury or sickness (Brunswick 2). There are not very many causes for dyslexia that

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