Dulce et Decorum Est

Topics: Poetry, Sonnet, Dulce et Decorum Est Pages: 3 (878 words) Published: December 3, 2013
"Dulce et Decorum est"
Summary and analysis for "Dulce et Decorum est"
Summary
The boys are bent over like old beggars carrying sacks, and they curse and cough through the mud until the "haunting flares" tell them it is time to head toward their rest. As they march some men are asleep, others limp with bloody feet as they'd lost their boots. All are lame and blind, extremely tired and deaf to the shells falling behind them. Suddenly there is gas, and the speaker calls, "Quick, boys!" There is fumbling as they try to put on their helmets in time. One soldier is still yelling and stumbling about as if he is on fire. Through the dim "thick green light" the speaker sees him fall like he is drowning. The drowning man is in the speaker's dreams, always falling, choking. The speaker says that if you could follow behind that wagon where the soldier's body was thrown, watching his eyes roll about in his head, see his face "like a devil's sick of sin", hear his voice gargling frothy blood at every bounce of the wagon, sounding as "obscene as cancer" and bitter as lingering sores on the tongue, then you, "my friend", would not say with such passion and conviction to children desirous of glory, "the old lie" of "Dulce et decorum est". Analysis

"Dulce et Decorum est" is, without a doubt, one of, if not the most, memorable and anthologized poems in Owen's oeuvre. Its vibrant imagery and it searing tone make it an unforgettable excoriation of WWI, and it has found its way into both literature and history course as a paragon of textual representation of the horrors of WWI. It was written in 1917 while Owen was at Craiglockhart, revised while he was at either Ripon or Scarborough in 1918, and was published posthumously in 1920. One version of it was sent to Susan Owen, the poet's mother, with the inscription, "Here is a gas poem done yesterday (which is not private, but not final)." The poem paints a battlefield scene of soldiers trudging along only to be interrupted by...
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