Duckweed Research Paper

Better Essays
Tyler Philbrook
May 7, 2013
Biological Science 2
Plymouth State University

Effects of Temperature on the Survival of Duckweed
Introduction

Common duckweed is a plant found floating in compact colonies in ponds, marshes, lakes, and slow moving streams. Duckweed is a very tiny pale green, seed bearing plant (Wang and Messing 2012). Duckweed consists of 1 to 3 fronds, or an oval shaped leave–like structure (Wedge and Burris 1982). These fronds grow no bigger than 10 millimeters and usually serve to attach to other fronds, which create massive thick mats of duckweed (Wedge and Burris 1982). A small root-like structure, known as a rootlet, hangs below the fronds (Wedge and Burris 1982).
Duckweed can spread very quickly and can cover the entire surface of a pond in a short amount of time. The growth of duckweed is common when the water contains high levels of nitrogen and phosphates (Wang and Messing 2012). Small amounts of duckweed will not harm a water source, but large amounts will stop the sunlight from entering the water. This can cause oxygen depletion, which can harm fish and submerged plants (Wang and Messing 2012). Studies have found that duckweed is able to survive under several different temperatures. Duckweed is more cold tolerant than other aquatic vascular plants. There are conditions such as seasonal temperature change that can result in a morphological alteration to another form, called turions (Wang and Messing 2012). When the temperature lowers the energy stored in the duckweed during photosynthesis is transferred to starch biosynthesis, causing the starch to gather in turions (Wang and Messing 2012). Due to the amount of intercellular air space becoming less and starch increases the density of the tissue, the duckweed is able to sink to the base of the water where the organism is still able to live even if the surface of the water freezes (Wang and Messing 2012). When the warm conditions return the duckweed will return



Cited: Wang, W. W., & Messing, J. M. (2012). Analysis of adp-glucose pyrophosphorylase expression during turion formation induced by abscisic acid in spirodela polyrhiza (greater duckweed). BMC Plant Biology , 12:5, Retrieved from http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2229/12/5 Appenroth, K. J. (2002). Co-action of temperature and phosphate in inducing turion formation in spirodela polyrhiza(great duckweed) . Plant Cell, and Environment , 25, 1079-1085. Retrieved from http://web.ebscohost.com.libproxy.plymouth.edu/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=0de4889c-7a43-49de-88d1-60a3add77f5f@sessionmgr198&vid=4&hid=103 Wedge, R. W., & Burris, J. B. (1982). Effects of light and temperature on duckweed photosynthesis. Aquatic Botany , 13, 133-140. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=MiamiImageURL&_cid=271225&_user=12417789&_pii=030437708290047X&_check=y&_origin=browseVolIssue&_zone=rslt_list_item&_coverDate=1982-12-31&_docsubtype=fla&wchp=dGLzVBA-zSkzV&md5=c986c2391a1eaac1b78904628eb603ae&pid=1-s2.0-030437708290047X-main.pdf

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Satisfactory Essays

    Duckweed

    • 278 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Duckweed 1.Taxanomy (Wikipedia) Kingdom: Plantae Order: Alismateles Family: Araceae Sub family : lemnoidae ( 2. habitat What? Duckweed is a stemless aquatic flowering plant . Lemencenae is a small free floating plant that grows on water surface.(clean flo) Where? Being a large populated plant duckweed is knownto be found all over the world.The most common places/sites to find duckweed are in ponds . They may also be found in fringesof lakesand in backwaters and some sloughs that are…

    • 278 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Duckweed

    • 1120 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Feed Industry Overview: Duckweed feed has been found to be a very nutritious feed source for many types of livestock. The fact that duckweed can be fed to animals in its wet form or dried for a more concentrated food source make an efficient, cost effective, harvester a possible attractive product for this market. Traditional Harvesters are economically unfeasible and manual harvesting is very labor intensive for medium to large scale operations. Feed prices can vary drastically due to crop…

    • 1120 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Duckweed Hypothesis

    • 598 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Duckweed as a nutrient thief and bioremediator Hypothesis: This experiment will evaluate duckweed and its ability to remove nutrients and toxins from water sources. Thus, duckweed will kill the organisms that require similar nutrients, yet aid the organisms that would otherwise die to toxins. Specifically, if one was to place Elodea plants in a tank with duckweed, then the Elodea will die due to the lack of nutrients from the duckweed having used the nutrients for its own benefits. Furthermore…

    • 598 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Duckweed Experiment

    • 516 Words
    • 3 Pages

    died quicker than Jar B and C. The CLR and water solutions acted as a fertilizer, so the greater the amount of CLR, the longer it stayed healthy or, in the case of Jar C, it even helps the duckweed fronds to reproduce. Ingredients in CLR, when mixed at a certain ratio with water, is actually helpful to the duckweed. There are many experimental…

    • 516 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    • Duckweed (Lemna minor) is a member of the Lemnaceae family (Monette et al. 2006) it is a small plant that floats on the surface of still or stagnant water that is usually rich in nutrients (Keddy 2010). It was seen that Duckweed thrived in areas of high nutrient content, high sunlight and warmer temperatures (Taylor 2011) .It was also seen that fertilisers contained nutrients, such as nitrates, which greatly influences duckweed growth. Duckweed is also used for feed for farm animal, such as ducks…

    • 801 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In this study, we found that the growth of the duckweed thalli did not have a significant difference in the NP solution and the creek water solution. Although we found that the duckweed grows faster in the NP solution, rather than the creek water they do indeed have relatively the same mean. Overall our results supports our hypothesis. This also makes us question what kinds of factors are affecting the creek water to kill off the duckweed. Duckweed also is known to stop the growth of algae, but in…

    • 767 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Duckweed Lab Report

    • 655 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The common duckweed also known as Lemna is often found in ponds, wetlands, and occasionally lakes. Duckweed is a very small, light green free-floating seed bearing plant. (aquaplant.com) Duckweed is known to take over the source of water it is in, in little time. It is forceful and can mix with other plants. The bodies of water that duckweed is mostly found in do not have waves or a strong current. They are typically only in still bodies of water although they can be found elsewhere. They are found…

    • 655 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    had a big influence on all of the graphs. Most of the experiments either went high up or low down on the last day. When you compare the various concentrations of K PO to the control they all grew, many of them exponentially. Research from "Duckweed Summary" showed that Duckweed grows under most conditions. The best way we could make this experiment more accurate it would be to improve it by eliminating the possible sources of error. The possible sources of error are, miscounting, mistakes…

    • 230 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Effect of Duckweed on Natural Pollutants: Part I- Introduction Duckweed: What is it? When you type in “duckweed”, or Lemnaceae, if you choose to use the scientific name, on your computer, you see countless entries on how to get rid of duckweed from your pond, how much duckweed can be a nuisance when it gets stuck in your fish filter, etc. However, this is a plant that can be underestimated. I chose to work with duckweed in my project because of the countless ways it can help the environment…

    • 1158 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Why Do Duckweed Grow

    • 292 Words
    • 2 Pages

    ammonia and die. Duckweed does not have a specific depth of water that it is required to grow in, however it is not ideal for the duckweed to grow in shallow conditions. If the pond is too shallow than the freezing and evaporating point of the pond will fluctuate too much for the duckweed to grow. Duckweed is composed of a think cell wall, with chloroplasts, mitochondria, smooth ER, Rough ER, a vacuole, cytoplasm, goolgi body, nucleus, nucleolus. All these parts in duckweed help the plant carry…

    • 292 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays