domestic violence

Topics: Domestic violence, Violence, Abuse, Child abuse, Violence against women, Physical abuse / Pages: 6 (1263 words) / Published: Jan 24th, 2014
Domestic Violence and its Causes and Effects

Domestic violence is when an intimate partner, such as a spouse or a person you are close with, physically, sexually, or psychologically abuses you. An abuser can come from all different types of backgrounds. Although there are no known causes why some people abuse others, there are a few theories to explain this behavior. Domestic Violence affects all races, ethnicities, and genders. It occurs in dating relationships, marriages, heterosexual relationships, and in homosexual relationships. However, it is more prevalent among women, especially immigrant women. Furthermore, domestic violence affects the children who witness it in their homes repeatedly. The injuries acquired by being exposed to this violence or by experiencing this violence directly range from physical injuries to psychological and emotional injures.

Putting a Face to Domestic Abuse

Domestic abuse is something a woman will likely deal with in her lifetime. 1 in 4 women will experience domestic violence at one point during her life (Tjaden, Thoennes 1). This shocking statistic puts the magnitude of this crime into perspective. 1 in 4 is something that cannot be ignored and must be addressed swiftly. Domestic violence strikes closer to home than you would think.

Domestic violence is not something you can foresee in somebody you are close with. Females are more likely to be victimized by somebody they know (“Criminal Victimization” 1). This is disturbing information, especially for a female to hear. You may be a target to a predator and not even realize due to a faux relationship. Women should always be aware of what’s going on around them and stay vigilant to any signs of abusive tendencies in a partner. The best way to avoid any confrontation is to remove you from potentially violent situations.

Domestic abuse can turn into more brazen attempts of aggression if not addressed immediately by the victim. 1 out of every 6 women has



Bibliography: Tjaden, Patricia & Thoennes, Nancy. National Institute of Justice and the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, “Extent, Nature and Consequences of Intimate Partner Violence: Findings from the National Violence against Women Survey,” (2000). U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, “Criminal Victimization, (2005),” September 2006. U.S. Department of Justice, “Prevalence, Incidence, and Consequences of Violence against Women,” November 1998. Costs of Intimate Partner Violence against Women in the United States (2003). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Centers for Injury Prevention and Control. Atlanta, GA. Costs of Intimate Partner Violence against Women in the United States (2003). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Centers for Injury Prevention and Control. Atlanta, GA. The Cost of Violence in the United States (2007). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Centers for Injury Prevention and Control. Atlanta, GA. U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, “Criminal Victimization,” (2003).

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