Disorganized Attachment Essay

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Disorganized attachment is typically defined as the occasional lack of an organized strategy when dealing with the Strange Situation Procedure (SSP) and is seen as an inconsistent regulation of emotion, regardless of secure or insecure secondary attachment classifications. Examples of disorganized attachment are hair pulling, conflicting behaviors, indifference or apprehension of their caregiver, and/or remaining still for a significant duration. Contradictory feelings are experienced by the disorganized infants’, whereas they fear and also need their caregiver as a primary support system. Children with dissociative behavior have been found to have higher levels of cortisol than their attachment counterparts, which may cause them to seek additional …show more content…
Additionally, parental insensitivity did not correlate with disorganized behavior in the studies reviewed. However, one analysis discovered an association between a specific genetic sequence and attachment subtype. Whereas, reliable indicators of disorganization are maltreatment, unresolved loss in the parent, marital discord, and low socioeconomic status. Furthermore, some studies discovered an association between the primary caregivers’ style of attachment during unresolved loss yet, further research is required. Although not consequential, outcomes associated with disorganized attachment are externalizing problems, the development of psychopathology, poorer regulation of stress, dissociative behavior later in life, and may predict issues with self-control and emotion regulation. Results from another study showed that disorganized children became increasingly angrier with age, supporting the association with externalizing problems, self-control issues, and difficulty regulating emotions. Additionally, researchers found a strong link between attachment style and conduct later in

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