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Discuss the The Psychoanalysis Treatment of Abnormality

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Discuss the The Psychoanalysis Treatment of Abnormality
Discuss the Psychoanalysis Treatment of Abnormality

Psychoanalysis is based on the idea that abnormal behaviors and feelings could be caused by factors in our unconscious that we are completely unaware of. These may be the result of unresolved conflicts or repressed memories from childhood. The therapist uses several techniques to uncover these factors or memories from the unconscious. The treatment involves a patient and therapist meeting regularly, possibly several times a week for several years, meaning they are likely to form a very close and trusting relationship.

Free association is one technique used; the patient says exactly what they are thinking, even if it seems irrelevant or unimportant and the therapist interprets what they might mean. Therapists and patients may also talk about dreams the patient has had and interpret these, both these techniques help to give an insight into the unconscious and bring into consciousness memories that have been repressed. The therapist will also spend lots of time discussing things with the patient and looking for clues or drawing conclusions about the possible causes of the patient’s problems. A patient may even recreate and transfer negative feelings onto the therapist (called transference).

Therapist and patient will continue to meet up several times a week, possibly for years, talking about the same issues again and again to try to resolve the issues causing the patient’s abnormal behavior. Getting an insight into the past and the cause of abnormal behavior can help a patient gain control of their feelings and minimize the negative influence the past creates on their current behavior.

Psychoanalysis has proved effective in many cases, Bergin estimated that in 80% of cases, the patient benefited. He also found however that the length and intensity of treatment played an important part in patient’s recovery rather than the overall type of treatment. The importance of the length of treatment was also

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