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Disadvantages of Iris Recognition

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Disadvantages of Iris Recognition
Disadvantages: a. Iris Recognition is intrusive.
b. Due to fluctuations, the Iris is hard t pinpoint
c. Iris Recognition is very expensive
A. The iris is a small target and a scan cannot be performed properly if the person is more than a few meters way. In order for an iris to be properly scanned, the person's head must be completely still. Eyelashes, lenses, and anything that would cause a reflection, could all make a scan difficult.
It is a moving target and can be obscured by objects such as the eyelid and eyelashes. Subjects who are blind or have cataracts can also pose a challenge to iris recognition, as there is difficulty in reading the iris.
The camera used in the process needs to have the correct amount of illumination. Without this, it is very difficult to capture an accurate image of the iris.
Along with illumination comes the problem with reflective surfaces within the range of the camera as well as any unusual lighting that may occur. All of these impact the ability of the camera to capture an accurate image. The system linked with the camera is currently only capturing images in a monochrome format. This results in problems with the limitations of greyscale making it difficult to distinguish the darker iris colorations from the pupil.
Although there is minimal intrusiveness with iris recognition, there is still the need for co- operation from subjects to enroll in the system and undergo subsequent authentication scans. Enrolling a non-cooperative subject would prove very difficult indeed. Inadequate training of users at the initial enrolment period will cause problems both at the initial enrolment time and subsequent authentications. Frustrated users will not help make the system any easier to use and will not be accepted by users as a convenient authentication method. Communication with users plays a major part in introducing such a system successfully.
B. The iris is harder to map as an image because it fluctuates based on the size of the

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