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Did Riel have a fair trial

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Did Riel have a fair trial
Did Louis Riel have a fair trial….
By: Anansha Gounder
Block: 1-2

1885 was a big year for many people in Canada. There were groups that loved all the changes or hated them. The people that hated them were the ones that it really didn’t effect, the ones it did effect were hated. Riel was the leader for these changes people looked up to Riel, but this this there were more people who hated him as well. Here I am trying to find out whether Riel had a fair trial or not because many find that he didn’t.

In 1885, Riel was charged with high treason for leading the North-West Rebellion against the Queen and her Canadian Government in an area now known as Saskatchewan. Prime Minister Macdonald decided that Riel had to be executed, regardless of widespread belief that Riel was mentally ill, and therefore should be given mercy. Riel's execution is often seen as a breaking point in the relations between the French and the English.

From a number of perspectives, Louis Riel did not receive a fair trial. First, that the case against Riel was being heard by a jury of six English-speaking men. At that point, the English and the French were not the most cordial. English-speaking men, at the small courtroom in Regina, have been against Riel’s beliefs and his side of the story. When the Hudson’s Bay Company gave up the control of Rupert’s Land in 1869, Riel created the Provisional Government to get closer to the Métis rights. Many English-speaking men thought that this was grounds for treason.
Ultimately, Riel was on trial. Quebec was concerned that if Riel would be hanged, they would be angry with the Conservative Party. If he were not hanged, Ontario would be enraged.

Many members of the Canadian government believed that Riel was insane, therefore not responsible for his actions due to diminished capacity. He did not refuse that he stayed at a mental hospital, but Riel said that the doctors had speculated that he was cured.
Louis Riel was an insane man, but his plan was to

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