Descriptive essay

Topics: Nigeria, Population, Niger Pages: 8 (1819 words) Published: September 3, 2014


NIGERIA

The purpose of this essay is to describe Nigeria. Officially it is a federal constitutional republic, located in West Africa and shares land borders with the Republic of Benin in the west, Chad and Cameroon in the east, and Niger in the north. Its coast in the south lies on the Gulf of Guinea on the Atlantic Ocean. Its three largest and most influential ethnic groups are the Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba. The name Nigeria was taken from the Niger River running through the country. This name was coined by Flora Shaw, the future wife of Baron Lugard, a British colonial administrator, in the late 19th century. It was colonized by the British in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, setting up administrative structures and law while recognizing traditional chiefs. It became independent again in 1960. It comprises 36 states and one Federal Capital Territory, which are further sub-divided into 774 Local Government Areas LGA. The plethora of states, of which there were only three at independence, reflect the country's tumultuous history and the difficulties of managing such a heterogeneous national entity at all levels of government. In some contexts, the states are aggregated into six geopolitical zones: North West, North East, North Central, South East, South- South, and South West. It has six cities with a population of over 1 million people (from largest to smallest: Lagos, Kano, Ibadan, Kaduna, Port Harcourt, and Benin City). Lagos is the largest city in sub-Saharan Africa, with a population of over 8 million in its urban area alone. Populations of its cities over a million are listed below: 1. Lagos 7,937,932

2. Kano 3,848,885
3. Ibadan 3,078,400
4. Kaduna 1,652,844
5. Port Harcourt 1,320,214
6. Benin City 1,051,600
7. Maiduguri 1,044,497
8. Zaria 1,018,827

Population in Nigeria increased from 1990 to 2008 by 57 million a 60% growth rate. Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa and accounts for about 18% of the continent's total population; however, exactly how populous is a subject of speculation. The United Nations estimates that the population in 2009 was at 154,729,000, distributed as 51.7% rural and 48.3% urban, and with a population density of 167.5 people per square kilometer. National census results in the past few decades have been disputed. The results of the most recent census were released in December 2006 and gave a population of 140,003,542. The only breakdown available was by gender: males 71,709,859, and females 68, 293, 08. According to the United Nations, the country has been undergoing explosive population growth and one of the highest growth and fertility rates in the world. By their projections, it is one of eight countries expected to account collectively for half of the world's total population increase from 2005–2050. By 2100 the UN estimates that the its population will be between 505 million and 1.03 billion people (middle estimate: 730 million). In 1950, Nigeria had only 33 million people. According to current data, one out of every four Africans is Nigerian. Presently, it is the seventh most populous country in the world, and even conservative estimates conclude that more than 20% of the world's black population lives in Nigeria. 2006 estimates claim 42.3% of the population is between 0–14 years of age, while 54.6% starting from 15–65; the birth rate is significantly higher than the death rate, at 40.4 and 16.9 per 1000 people respectively Its education is in a state of neglect. After the 1970s oil boom, tertiary education was improved so that it would reach every sub region. Education is provided free by the government, but the attendance rate for secondary education is only 29% (32% for males, 27% for females). The education system has been described as "dysfunctional" largely because of decaying institutional infrastructure. 68% of the population is literate, and the rate for men (75.7%) is higher than that for women (60.6%). Its largest city is...
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Writing and Descriptive Essays
  • Sense and Descriptive Essay
  • essay
  • Narrative Essay Vs. Descriptive Essay
  • how to write a descriptive essay
  • Writing and Descriptive Essay
  • how to write a descriptive essay
  • Writing and Descriptive Essay

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free