Describe The Relationship Between Jim And Huckleberry Finn

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The civil rights era was a time when equal opportunities and rights were barred from individuals based on the color of their skin. Martin Luther King Jr., a prominent leader at this time, wanted to change this. He wanted to change the way how others viewed African Americans and ensure them the same rights every other white citizen had in America. King hoped for a day when people would come together and realize each other's worth, overlooking the factor of one’s race. This idea of knowing the importance of one’s worth can be seen in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn as Jim and Huck travel down the Mississippi together. In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Twain uses the relationship between Jim and Huck to showcase the understanding of another person’s value, regardless of race. …show more content…
Like most of white society, Huck believes that slaves are considered to be property and not human beings. Huck starts to think about how he helped Jim and then narrates, “It hadn’t ever come home to me before, what this thing was that I was doing. But now it did; and it stayed with me, and scorched me more and more. I tried to make out to myself that I warn’t to blame, because I didn’t run Jim off from his rightful owner” (Twain 87-88). This shows that Huck is just as blind as his racist peers. Huck actually feels remorse because he helped Jim escape. At the time, Huck did not even take into account the possibility of Jim being a free man. Instead, he sees Jim as a stolen piece of

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