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Describe How The 1950s And 1960s Changed America

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Describe How The 1950s And 1960s Changed America
How the 1950s and 1960s changed the United States Your grandparents or great grandparents were obviously hormone filled young men and women. As many men were coming home from war, so were a ton of hormones. There were 76.4 million babies born from 1946 to 1964, with the greatest overall numbers coming from 1954 through 1964. By 1964 those babies, known as “baby boomers”, accounted for almost 40 percent of the United States population. Along with the growing population came a growing need for more homes. A family of two children and only one working parent could afford the basic necessities of life and then some. With televisions becoming widely popular and available to a “common” family, it quickly became the number one way to spread news …show more content…
Communism and the threat of nuclear war rapidly put fear into american lives. Children were taught in school what to do if a nuclear attack was to happen. Families built bomb shelters in their backyard and started building up rations in case of a fallout. An important in the spread of communism was Joseph McCarthy. He was a senator who used his speeches to spread communism by attacking members of congress and accusing them of being communists. The amount of accusations he had quickly dropped when he was under heavy criticism from President Eisenhower. McCarthy was very harsh in his accusations although he was very inaccurate and full of lies. Communism was a very big part in the way the United States grew in the 1950s. It made America know that we needed to be the role model for the rest of the …show more content…
His new and sexual style of music and dancing was frowned upon by parents but loved by teenagers. Part of that was because of the tight grasp parents had on their children. Along with Elvis were many other rock and roll enthusiasts including Buddy Holly and Dion DiMucci. On February 3rd 1959 Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and Big Bopper died in a plane crash. It is referred to as “The day the music died” because of the significance of the music artists on board. Buddy Holly was one of the hottests artists on the market with his style of music unmatched by anyone. Ritchie Valens was about to go gold with his song “Donna”. They are good examples of how music grasped children and teenagers and really shaped the way they grew up and how they interacted with their parents. As interesting as it sounds both John Lennon and George Harrison of The Beatles learned to play guitar by listening to Buddy Holly. Don McLeans single “American Pie” was written about Buddy Holly and how he made people fall in love with music. The song was also written to show how life from there on out change. He expressed that as the time music and our country started to move into the hippie phase and eventually the hip-hop era. Dion DiMucci was embarrassed to go on the flight as the cost of the ticket would be as much as his month's rent that his parents were paying. Following the crash DiMucci went into drug

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