Definition Essay ENG 106

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The World is a Canvas: A Definition Argument Essay on Graffiti
Chloe Roy
Grand Canyon University: ENG 106
January 30, 2014

Art is generally seen as a canvas transformed into a beautiful and thought – provoking decoration. Genres and technique styles continue to evolve and transform over the centuries, creating new ways to influence the world through art. Graffiti is a controversial new genre and technique style that has taken the art community – and the urban streets by storm. The artists of this new genre call it “Street Art” and use the world as their canvas to provoke thoughts on controversial topics to the average man. A street art editorial written in 2013 states, “ Street art is contradictory: a form of artistic expression that resists institutional legitimacy while it simultaneously becomes more widespread, more accepted – an institution in its own right” (Sweeny, 2013). Stating that street art has ripple effect of its own in the art community. Aesthetics of an art piece is when a feeling of emotion and sensation is provoked in someone. Banksy, an anonymous street artist from Bristol, New Britain describes graffiti in his own words, “Bus stops are far more interesting and useful places to have art than in museums. Graffiti has more chance of meaning something or changing stuff than anything indoors. Graffiti has been used to start revolutions, stop wars, and generally is the voice of people who aren’t listened to. Graffiti is one of those few tools you have if you have almost nothing” (Buzzell, 2005). Art pieces over the centuries have depicted the corrupt political system, such as the revolution in France in the 1700s. Modern day street artists use the same criteria to give a new perspective to civilians. Each form of art requires a specific skill set that takes time and practice to master. Whether the medium is watercolors, oil pant, or a spray can the artist must be able to use the medium to portray their message. Graffiti like any other



References: Sweeny, R. b. (2013). STREET Art. Art Education, 66(5), 4-5. Buzzell C. I Am Banksy. Esquire, 144(6), 198-250. Street-Smart Art. (2009). Art Business News, 36(9), 42-46 DeNotto, M. m. (2014). Street art and graffiti College & Research Libraries News 75(4), 208- 2011.

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