Defending Childhood Education

Good Essays
C Miranda
English 101
March 9, 2013
Adult Education
By Mortimer J. Adler
When I read Adler’s passage, "Education consists in the growth of understanding, insight and ultimately some wisdom. Only in mature soil, soil rich with experience, can ideas really take root", (Adler) my first reaction was to defend childhood education based on my work history and education. Children learn through play and through play they have experiences which are very much a part of their education. These are experiences that last a life time from their intellectual development to their social-emotional growth. I felt that the author was criticizing the education of young children by saying children are only trainable or schooled not educated by life experiences.
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Through my experience I have found this to be true in many aspects. Children are able to learn and speak a second language just through interacting with peers that speak the foreign language. This process usually depends on the child and the level of language skills they already possess. Concepts and skills are learned through play and interactions with peers and adults. These experiences are the building blocks that set the foundation of the education for the child. Adults attempting to learn a foreign language must spend several months, if not years, mastering the language if they are able to learn it at all. New skills tend to come easily to adults that have had formal training such as preschool, elementary and secondary …show more content…
Children, who are neglected, abused and have no parental guidance have a lesser chance of a strong social-emotional foundation. These children will sometimes grow up with trust issues, problems learning and irreversible social issues. These children are not able to concentrate at school, which causes them to do poorly during their formal training or schooling. Child abuse and neglect can have an impact on an adult 's quality of life in many fundamental ways. It makes basic day-to-day activities, such as eating, sleeping, working and study, very difficult for many people that have this history behind them. Child abuse and neglect can also affect a person’s mental health, physical health, and current relationships with the people around you. Not being able to trust the world around them causes them to have a poor quality of life. The education and experience they received as a child has been in mistrust and betrayal. Adler states that he admits that children are containers of different sizes and they do not all have the same capacity. Children are like sponges that soak up information good or bad. With training and redirection from the negative experience in the forms of therapy and counseling children can become well rounded and highly educated

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