Death of a Salesman

Topics: Death of a Salesman, Life, James Truslow Adams, American Dream / Pages: 36 (8993 words) / Published: May 2nd, 2012
Death of a Salesman
Introduction
The declaration of independence declared that every American is born with rights; inalienable rights and freedom that would see home or her achieve the American dream. Arthur Miller’s "Death of a Salesman" is a story of a protagonist, Willy Loman, who is striving to achieve the dream, though he realizes his rights extremely late in his life struggles. According to the American dream fundamental, one needed to be industrious and be liked in order to success. Therefore, anybody with ambition, honest and hardworking was bound to succeed. In this story, some characters achieve success, become wealthy, and finally seize power over others. Willy strongly believed in American dream and knew he had the opportunity to successes. The only problem was that his hard work was not enough to earn him the success and everything he ever wanted in life.
Thesis
Willy Loman is a personification of the struggle the poor and minority struggle through in their effort to achieve the American dream. The society prejudices the poor man’s effort to succeed causing Loman to be alienated from the society (Miller “Death of a Salesman: Certain Private Conversations” 2). This paper examines Arthur Miller’s play with regard to its reflection of the American values, and that entails success in modern America.
The American Dream
Willy Loman is enthusiastically dedicated to pursuing the American dream, which requires that a person be "well liked", hardworking and attractive to successes in business. When he achieves that, he would be able to attain and accumulate all the material wealth he needs to survive in the modern American life (Parker 26). Contrary to his mindset, with the superficial characteristics of being liked and being attractive, there needs to be a deeper understanding if the American dream concept is to succeed. He is phony in his interpretation of the American dream; therefore, he fails to change with times hence causing him to suffer



Cited: Annas, Pamela, and Robert, Rosen. Literature and Society: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, Drama, Nonfiction. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 2007. Print. Brockett, Oscar. “An Introduction to Death of a Salesman.” Readings on Arthur Miller. Ed. Thomas Siebold. San Diego, CA: Greenhaven Press Inc., 1997. 96-103. Dusenbury, Winifred. “Loneliness in Death of a Salesman.” Readings on Arthur Miller. Ed. Thomas Siebold. San Diego, CA: Greenhaven Press Inc., 1997. 116-124. Print. Miller, Arthur. Death of a Salesman. London: Heinemann. 1994. Print. Miller, Arthur. Death of a Salesman: Certain Private Conversations in Two Acts and a Requiem. New York, NY: Penguin Books, 1999. Print. Murray, Edward. “Characterization in Death of a Salesman.” Readings on Arthur Miller. Ed. Thomas Siebold. San Diego, CA: Greenhaven Press Inc., 1997. 110-115. Print. Parker, Brian. “Point Of View in Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman.” Modern Critical Interpretations: Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman. Ed. Harold Bloom. New York: Chelsea House Publishers, 1988. 25-38. Print. Sterling, Eric. Arthur Miller 's Death of a Salesman. New York: Rodopi, 2008. Print. Ward, Selena, and Arthur Miller. Death of a Salesman: Arthur Miller. New York: Spark Publishers, 2002. Print.

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