Death of a Saleman - Happy Loman

Powerful Essays
Happy Loman

Happy shares none of the poetry that erupts from Biff and that is buried in Willy—he is the stunted incarnation of Willy’s worst traits and the embodiment of the lie of the happy American Dream. As such, Happy is a difficult character with whom to empathize. He is one-dimensional and static throughout the play. His empty vow to avenge Willy’s death by finally “beat[ing] this racket” provides evidence of his critical condition: for Happy, who has lived in the shadow of the inflated expectations of his brother, there is no escape from the Dream’s indoctrinated lies. Happy’s diseased condition is irreparable—he lacks even the tiniest spark of self-knowledge or capacity for self-analysis. He does share Willy’s capacity for self-delusion, trumpeting himself as the assistant buyer at his store, when, in reality, he is only an assistant to the assistant buyer. He does not possess a hint of the latent thirst for knowledge that proves Biff’s salvation. Happy is a doomed, utterly duped figure, destined to be swallowed up by the force of blind ambition that fuels his insatiable sex drive.

Character Analysis
Happy might as well be Willy Jr., because this apple hasn't fallen far from the tree. Though he is relatively successful in his job, he has his dad's totally unrealistic self-confidence, and his grand dreams about getting rich quick. Like Biff, but to a lesser extent, Happy has suffered from his father's expectations. Mostly, though, his father doesn't pay that much attention to him. Willy was always a bigger fan of Biff. Happy, maybe because he always felt second best, has more of a desire to please his father. Despite his respectable accomplishments in business, and the many, many notches on his bedpost, Happy is extremely lonely.

Happy is competitive and ambitious, but these feelings are misdirected. Unable to compete on his own terms in the business world, Happy blindly pursues women – taken women – purely for the sake of doing so. Looks like

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Better Essays

    Happy Loman

    • 1100 Words
    • 5 Pages

    play at the unique theater, American Players Theater. This play was called “The Death of a Salesman”. The play was directed by Kenneth Albers with starring characters named, Willy Loman, Linda Loman, Biff Loman, Happy Loman, Charley, Uncle Ben, and Bernard. This play was about the Loman family that is falling apart, however, can’t seem to realize their failure themselves. The character who struggles the most is, Willy Loman. Willy is the father of the family and he believes that the way to be successful…

    • 1100 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Nalinika Singh-Deocharan Professor: Elliot Hearst Eng 101.576A 29 May 2014 American Dream in Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller. The concept of the American Dream is based on the idea that everyone has the opportunity to seek their own dreams. The term American Dream is not only popular among Americans but is known worldwide. America has always been regarded as the land of opportunity and freedom. The American Dream has been shaped by the people who have been chasing their unique dreams. Immigrants…

    • 3140 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    In Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman, Happy Loman is discontent with his life because his father Willy gave him false hopes that made him slave to the American Dream. Happy is still trying to find his way in life, but comes off with a false confidence that he believes he is actually on the right track. Since family is one of the prominent elements of the American dream Willy has continuously ingrained in his sons head that prosperity and success are the key to having a happy and fulfilling life…

    • 996 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    material possessions. In the case of Willy Loman, of Death of a salesman, he strongly believes in this dream, but unfortunately he doesn’t factor in hard work, but instead thinks he can achieve success in the business world by being “well liked” and “personally attractive”. Willy’s superficial understanding of the American dream leads to insecurities and false hopes for himself and his sons Biff and Happy who also have a warped interpretations. The Death of a…

    • 751 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Happy Loman is recognized by his excessive insecurity. He reliably depends on other individuals' opinions to settle on his own decisions. His dishonorable approach towards women makes him an immature man. The reason he's so insecure is a result of the example his dad, Willy, set for him. Happy is continually taking after the feelings of other individuals. Whether it's his dad Willy, or his mom Linda, he quite often ensures that his opinion happens in the meantime as others'. At the point when Willy…

    • 435 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Death Of A Loman Analysis

    • 354 Words
    • 2 Pages

    happen through the unexpected detours, encounters with people or things or through hardships suffered. The changes can seem to make a small change to a person at first but over time they end up changing a person in a dramatic way. Arthur Miller’s Death of A Salesman, 1964, shows audiences the mental decent of an ageing man at the bottom of his career as a salesman, shows how his struggles in life have lead him to feel useless and hopeless this is contrasted to Lewis Carroll’s Alice…

    • 354 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    A man who passed with many failed accomplishments, William Loman (best known for Willy), who never really lived to the full expectations he wanted. He always wanted to be a salesman but killed himself at the age of 63. This was all because he was a fool and his pride seemed to overtake everything else. He was only 17 when he dropped out of school to become a traveling salesman. When he was in Boston he was on his to a conference when he met me, his wife, Linda. He had always told me that my eyes…

    • 629 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman, Willy Loman instills his own skewed vision of success into his sons; however, Biff Loman rejects Willy's teachings and looks for success elsewhere, while Happy Loman follows Willy's advice and leads a materialistic and idealistic, yet unsatisfactory, lifestyle. Hard work and success are not intertwined in Willy’s mind; instead, he believes that he can succeed by the merit of his charm alone. This wisdom, when imparted to Biff, leaves him confused with how…

    • 1073 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    one major decision takes place before the action of the play. She chooses to marry and emotionally support Willy Loman, a man who wanted to be great but defined greatness as being “well liked” by others. Because of Linda’s choice, the rest of her life will be filled with disappointment. In the Loman family, each character is given a pivotal role in how they ultimately affect the death of Willy. While each figure is an enabler to some degree, Linda has knowledge from virtually all sides of the situation…

    • 507 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In Arthur Miller's “Death of a salesman “ we learn all about tragedy and happiness. Willy Loman, the main character is a very charismatic person, he has bursts of happiness and bursts of anger and sadness. His two sons Biff and Happy contribute to his mood in many different aspects, we start to see how relationships mold and how they fall. Through Willy's actions the reader can see Willy is a chronic liar throughout the story. Willy loman starts off this book with a great attitude and sense…

    • 645 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays