Deaf Literature Research Paper

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Investigation Three – Deaf literature and ASL literature
In Deaf Culture, there are two types of literature, Deaf literature and ASL literature. Deaf literature is “composed of works by deaf authors and literary works by deaf or hearing authors, which include deaf characters in short stories, novels, poetry, and plays” (“Deaf Literature”). The Deaf Child Crossing series (https://www.goodreads.com/series/120992-deaf-child-crossing), written by Marlee Matlin, is an example of Deaf literature. The series is considered Deaf literature because a deaf author wrote it and the main character in the story is deaf. Yet, Deaf literature is only one unique form of literature that the Deaf Culture has. The other form of literature in the Deaf Culture is ASL literature.
ASL literature has been passed down from generation to generation in a face-to-face manner and is “composed of poetry or stories told in American Sign Language (ASL) with an artistic approach” (“ASL Literature”). A well-known example of ASL literature is “Birds of a Different Feather” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IRE_r_pXuHY or https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MbxPaBgGhDs) by storyteller Benjamin James Bahan. ASL literature has many forms and genres, such as, “alphabet or number stories, multi-people poems, manipulation of the speed of repeated movement
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This though does not mean that it is not a viable form of literature. According to Sherman Wilcox, “literary works need not be recorded in writing to constitute literature” (Wilcox 70). ASL literature can still be included among other literature, because even though it is not written, “much of this literature has been recorded of filmed on videotape” (Wilcox 70). Overall, ASL literature is a viable form of literature because not all literature needs to be in a written form. It can also be included among other forms of literature because we are able to keep a record of it through

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