Dawes Act Dbq

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There were benefits and sacrifices for adapting the Dawes Act in 1887. It allowed Native Americans to merge with Americans through U.S. citizenship. It also opened land for settlers to move West, but at the same time allotted Native Americans a selective amount of land. Native Americans were required to register with an English name on the Dawes Poll to be considered in the land distribution. The Act is perceived by some that it benefited the American people more than the Native Americans.

The Dawes Act was intended to be done in a reasonable and humane way. If the Dawes program was not corrupt by its Agents, it may have been successful. Native Americans would have kept a substantial amount of their land along with having the right to be

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