DBQ: The Alien And Sedition Acts Of 1798

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As time surges on so does the bitterness between countries. 1797 marks a commemorative year as the "XYZ Affair" later launched a series of acts that created tension throughout the country. The Alien and Sedation Acts of 1798 not only oppressed the freedom of aliens wanting to become citizens in the country, but broaden conflicts between the Federalist and Republican parties, and the beginnings of a break in the government. The two political parties of Federalists and Republicans differed to a great extent and centered on domestic and foreign policy differences, reached their highest point of disagreement upon the passage of the Alien and Sedition Acts in 1978, in purpose that one party would remain in control by limiting the power and growth of the other party (Doc S). Under the threat of war with France, Congress in 1798 passed four laws in an effort to strengthen the Federal government, known as the Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798. These acts did not permit anyone to criticize the government at all, through writing, or any other shape, form, or fashion as if their views on government did not matter at all (Doc B). Many people wished that acts would be executed for they knew that it would divide the nation that was trying to become one (Doc O). It also extended the time to become an American citizen, since the Federalists believed that …show more content…
Such as the constant differences that between Jefferson's and Hamilton's views on how the government should be controlled (Doc E). With the acts formed many feared that they would break up the three powers (Doc Q). In a way the acts should only be used as a weapon in favor of one political party. (Doc P). For the differences that was only supposed to be retained in different political parties; the Alien and Sedation Acts of 1798 had broken those borders and but the balance of the government on unstable

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