Preview

Current Issues and Trends in Assessment in Early Childhood Education

Good Essays
Open Document
Open Document
6422 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Current Issues and Trends in Assessment in Early Childhood Education
Current Issues and Trends in Assessment in Early Childhood Education
The 1980s brought a new reform movement in education, accompanied by a new emphasis on testing. The effort to improve education at all levels included the use of standardized tests to provide accountability for what students are learning. Minimum competency tests, achievement tests, and screening instruments were used to ensure that students from preschool through college reached the desired educational goals and achieved the minimum standards of education that were established locally or by the state education agency. As we continue in a new century, these concerns have increased.
Trends in a New Century
In the 1990s many schools improved the learning environment and achievement for all children; nevertheless, a large percentage of schools were still low performing in 2000 and 2001. Inadequate funding, teacher shortages, teachers with inadequate training, aging schools, and poor leadership affected quality education (Wortham, 2002). During the 2000 presidential campaign, candidate George W. Bush named quality education as one of the goals of his presidency. After his election, President Bush worked for legislation that would improve education for all children. After months of dialogue and debate, Congress passed a new education actin December 2001. The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), signed into law onJanuary 8, 2002, had an impact on testing required by individual states. In addition to other provisions, all states were required to administer tests developed by the state and to set and monitor adequate yearly progress (Moscosco, 2001; Wortham, 2002). Former President Bush was also committed to strengthening early childhood programs. In 2002, several projects were conducted to support early childhood programs. Under the Sunshine Schools program, the U.S. Department of Education focused on what is working in early childhood education and gave attention to highly effective state, district, city,

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    High-Stakes Testing: A Tool for Improvement Tania-Farzeen Mian EDUC 606-D09 LUO Dr. Steven McDonald Since the early 60’s varying attempts have been made to improve the education system of America. After the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law was passed in 2002, all students in public schools started to get tested and the results were used to measure the success of the school and district. “High-stakes testing, by its very definition, is the most extreme form of testing, for it results in the most direct, far-reaching set of consequences for the test taker. Thus, high-stakes testing bears great significance for human achievements, individual lives and educational practices alike ” (Ydesen, p, 98, 2014). A state-wide or national standardized test is usually used for this form of testing. Today the main purpose for high-stakes testing is to evaluate the schools, teachers, and students and to hold them accountable for the education being provided and learned. Over 25 states use the results of these tests to make decisions regarding the education system. If the results are found to be positive and/or showing improvements the schools are rewarded financially, but if the results are negative, showing a lack of improvement, the schools could be closed down. (Ydeses, 2014)…

    • 710 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Standardized tests are now a common practice among America’s schools. This has caused one of the most controversial debates in society today. Supposedly, they are a great way to measure student achievement, but it appears that the exams could be much more detrimental than they seem. Students are failing to pass year-long classes due to a single test. There is no way that the information learned within such an amount of time can be accurately or even fairly assessed this way.…

    • 840 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    No Child Left Behind Act

    • 1177 Words
    • 5 Pages

    1. Definition of the Policy The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) signed into law by President George W. Bush on January 8, 2002, is a comprehensive overhaul of the federal governments requirements of state and local education systems (www.nclb.gov). It reauthorizes the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 and replaces the 1994 Improving Americas Schools Act.…

    • 1177 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Standardized testing has become the focus of modern school reform since the implementation of the No Child Left Behind law in 2002 (Evans 1). The act was designed to hold all public schools to a high standard of education, measured by the results of students’ test scores on statewide standardized tests. Not all students are good test takers, and not all careers require the ability to take traditional tests in order to be successful on the job. A significant number of students nowadays would care much about standardized tests. This is because students feel like they must worry about a test which directly affects their grades and ability to learn. Standardized tests place a heavy weight on students that can lead to stress, take up instruction timing, and students won’t be able to learn anything from them.…

    • 407 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    President Bush signed The No Child Left behind Act (NCLB) in 2001, and it was enacted in 2002. It is the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, which itself was reauthorized in 1994. The NCLB expanded the role of the federal government in education and has become the pivotal point of public education, spurring debates amongst for anyone interested. The act is aimed at improving education of disadvantaged students by holding states, schools, and educators accountable for student progress. (Education Week September 21, 2004).…

    • 1204 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Annotated Bibliography

    • 1322 Words
    • 4 Pages

    This article focuses on methods that could take the place of standardized testing. It also points out that the No Child Left Behind act has killed many school practices. This article also states that no other nation test’s as much as the United States.…

    • 1322 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    On January 8, 2002, President Bush signed into law the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). This law represents his education reform plan and contains changes to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) since it was enacted in 1965. It is asking America's schools to describe their success in terms of what each student accomplishes. The act contains the President's four basic education reform principles: stronger accountability for results, especially in reading, increased flexibility and local control, expanded options for parents, and teacher and staff quality.…

    • 654 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Standardized Testing

    • 1279 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Synthesis Essay on Standardized Testing Standardized testing in the United States started in the mid- 1800’s (Standardized Tests - ProCon.org). This kind of testing was originally created to measure students’ performance and progress in school (Standardized Tests - ProCon.org). In recent years, the public school system has relied heavily on the information this test provides, in doing so creating controversy. Other than being a student myself, and participating in multiple standardized exams such as, CSAP, ACT, and SAT, I do not have much background knowledge on this debate. The debate over standardized testing has raised this inquiry question: What are the effects of standardized testing on the United States public education system? I believe that the effects that standardized testing has on the US public education system is good and bad. Within these articles if found common themes, including elements of objectivity and subjectivity, a rise in cheating, and measurement of student success.…

    • 1279 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    In addition, this case also brings forth the question of how early in their academic career should children be exposed to these types of tests. These tests were implemented to prepare students for their future middle school and high school careers. However, the role of elementary school is not limited to just preparing children academically, but it is also for nurturing social skills needed for students to communicate with their peers and helping children build confidence and esteem. These kind of standardized tests that were taken at Resembool may prioritize the role of academically preparing the students while sacrificing or demeaning other essential roles that elementary schooling must play.…

    • 1469 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    No Child Left Behind Act

    • 1272 Words
    • 6 Pages

    President Bush quoted, "Clearly, our children are our future…Too many of our neediest children are being left behind" (www.ed.gov). The "No Child Left Behind" Act expands the federal government's role in elementary and secondary education. The NCLB emphasizes accountability and abiding by policies set by the federal government. This law sets strict requirements and deadlines for states to expand the scope and frequency of student testing, restore their accountability system and guarantee that every classroom is staffed by a teacher qualified to teach in his or her subject area. Furthermore, the NCLB requires states to improve the quality of their schools from year to year. The NCLB pushes state governments and educational systems to help low-achieving and low-efficiency learners in high-poverty schools meet the same academic standards that apply to all other students.…

    • 1272 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    What is No Child Left Behind? George W. Bush and his administration proposed the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. It is a reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (“No Child Left Behind,” 2004). NCLB is based on…

    • 2984 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Literature Plan Ece 335

    • 1699 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Morrison, G. S. (2009). Early childhood education today (11th ed.). Upper Saddle River: Pearson. What are the Different Forms of Authentic Assessment. (1997). Retrieved March 15, 2010, from…

    • 1699 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    George W. Bush put into action the No Child Left Behind Act to ensure that all children were giving the right education and succeeding. With this, many states adopted a standard-based curriculum approach that required for all schools to have a state-wide test for accountability. This has definitely influenced and changed the teachings of many schools (Wiles & Bondi, 2007).…

    • 1570 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    A Test Destined For Failure In America, standardized testing has become a prevalent method for testing the educational ability of students. Tests such as the SAT for College and the California STAR for elementary and junior high students have been administered since the beginning of the 20th century. These tests are often considered by many as crucial for the academic progression of students into further education, such as an elementary student being promoted from third to fourth grade or a high school senior applying to college. However, standardized tests have setbacks which could jeopardize a student’s future academic progression given he/she fails to pass. Therefore, I believe standardized tests are ineffective at measuring a student’s capabilities and hence interfere with true academic learning.…

    • 588 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    CASE EXAMPLE A: Elaine has sued Jerry because Jerry fired her. Elaine was on the job for two months. The job offer letter she had been given mentioned the great career opportunities at the company and stated that her annual salary would be $30,000. The employer is an employment at will employer. Elaine was given no reason for the termination. After the termination, Jerry hired a man named Kramer, who had less job experience and education than Elaine, for the position. Elaine has sued to get her job back.…

    • 422 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays