Culture in New Zealand

Powerful Essays
Implications for Managing Human Resources

New Zealand
The country’s indigenous name is Aotearoa (Land of the Long White Cloud).
History:
New Zealand is an island and was discovered by Polynesian and started migrating before AD 900. British captain James Cook visited this Island in 1769. Maori and British signed a treaty of Waitangi, which granted the Maori legal protection and rights to perpetual ownership of their lands and resources. Only the Crown was entitled to buy land from Maori. Britain granted New Zealand internal self-government and by 1907 the nation became independent (“Culture Grams,” 2010).
Population:
Total population of New Zealand is over 4.2 million and is growing by 0.9% annually. About 87% of the total population lives in urban areas. The main cities are, Christchurch, Wellington, and Auckland. About 70% of population is European descent (“Pakeha”), and 8% is Maori (“Culture Grams,” 2010).
Language & Religion: English and Maori are official languages. English is the most common everyday language, while Maori is used in educational and cultural settings. Main religion is Christian. 56% of the population follow the Christianity. About 35% of New Zealanders do not follow any religion (“Culture Grams,” 2010).
Government:
New Zealand is a member of Britain’s Commonwealth and Queen Elizabeth II is the head of the state. Anand Satyanand, the Governor-General in the country represents the Queen. John Key the Prime Minister is the head of the Government. Members of the House of Representatives are elected to three-year term. The voting age is 18 (“Culture Grams,” 2010). Auckland, Christchurch, and Wellington are the biggest cities in the country. We are choosing Auckland in order to research the issues related to the employment laws, cultural and communication protocol, behavior to the work place, political and economic climate, and family consideration and life standard. Auckland is the most populous and most multicultural



References: Auckland-life.com. (2010). Retrieved from www.auckland-life.com/culture/culture.php Culture Grams. (2010). Family. Retrieved from http://online.culturegrams.com.rap.ocls.ca/world/world_country_sections.php? contid=8&wmn=Oceania&cid=112&cn=New_Zealand&sname=Family&snid =11 Culture Grams Culture Grams. (2010). Population. Retrieved form http://online.culturegrams.com.rap.ocls.ca/world/world_country_sections.php? contid=8&wmn=Oceania&cid=112&cn=New_Zealand&sname=Population&s nid=3 Culture Grams Culture Grams. (2010). Religion. Retrieved form http://online.culturegrams.com.rap.ocls.ca/world/world_country_sections.php? contid=8&wmn=Oceania&cid=112&cn=New_Zealand&sname=Religion&sni d=5 Culture Grams Culture Grams. (2010). General Attitudes. Retrieved from http://online.culturegrams.com.rap.ocls.ca/world/world_country_sections.php? contid=8&wmn=Oceania&cid=112&cn=New_Zealand&sname=General_Attit udes&snid=6 Culture Grams Culture Grams. (2010). Greetings. Retrieved from http://online.culturegrams.com.rap.ocls.ca/world/world_country_sections.php? contid=8&wmn=Oceania&cid=112&cn=New_Zealand&sname=Greetings&s nid=8 Culture Grams Culture Grams. (2010). Visiting. Retrieved from http://online.culturegrams.com.rap.ocls.ca/world/world_country_sections.php? contid=8&wmn=Oceania&cid=112&cn=New_Zealand&sname=Visiting&sni d=26 Culture Grams Culture Grams. (2010). Recreation. Retrieved from http://online.culturegrams.com.rap.ocls.ca/world/world_country_sections.php? contid=8&wmn=Oceania&cid=112&cn=New_Zealand&sname=Recreation&s nid=14 Culture Grams Culture Grams. (2010). Health. Retrieved from http://online.culturegrams.com.rap.ocls.ca/world/world_country_sections.php? contid=8&wmn=Oceania&cid=112&cn=New_Zealand&sname=Health&snid =22 Department of Labour Department of Labour. (2010). Work life balance. Retrieved form www.dol.govt.nz/worklife/flexible/index.asp The World Fact Book Numbeo. (2010). Cost of living. Retrieved form www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Powerful Essays

    Study, Work, and Live in New Zealand. (n.d.). Retrieved May 27, 2015, from Studyplus: http://www.studyplus.co.nz/content/major-cities-nz…

    • 2290 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    New Zealand Research Paper

    • 2105 Words
    • 9 Pages

    The first people to find New Zealand were the Maori people. They first arrived in New Zealand in about the tenth century A.D.(“About”). Now, Maori people make up fourteen percent of the New Zealand population (“About”). The Maori people named New Zealand “land of the long, white, cloud” (“About”). Europeans first sighted New Zealand in the seventeenth century and by the early nineteenth century British settlers had arrived. New Zealand became a British colony in 1840 with the signing of the Waitangi Treaty (Smelt 19). The Treaty of Waitangi is very important to the New Zealand people. This agreement between the British Crown and the Maori Chiefs is the founding document of New Zealand (Shepard 51). In 1852 Britain allowed New Zealand to be self-governing. As people continued to migrate to New Zealand there was an increasing demand for the land. Conflict between settlers and the Maori eventually led to land wars in the 1960s. In the end, the Maori lost the war and their land (Smelt 24). New Zealanders have sought to modify capitalism by destroying privilege, expanding human opportunities through education, and providing secure employment, free medical care and inexpensive housing (“New” 247a).…

    • 2105 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Polynesian Culture

    • 6897 Words
    • 28 Pages

    The beliefs and practices of the indigenous peoples of the ethnogeographic group of Pacific Islands known as Polynesia (from Greek poly ‘many’ and nēsoi ‘islands’). Polynesia encompasses a huge triangular area of the east-central Pacific Ocean. The triangle has its apex at the Hawaiian Islands in the north and its base angles at New Zealand (Aotearoa) in the west and Easter Island (Rapa Nui) in the east. It also includes (from northwest to southeast) Tuvalu, Tokelau, Wallis and Futuna, Samoa (formerly Western Samoa), American Samoa, Tonga, Niue, theCook Islands, French Polynesia (Tahiti and the other Society Islands, the Marquesas Islands, the Austral Islands, and the Tuamotu Archipelago, including the Gambier Islands [formerly the Mangareva Islands]), and Pitcairn Island. At the turn of the 21st century, about 70 percent of the total population of Polynesia resided in Hawaii.…

    • 6897 Words
    • 28 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Australia is geographically located just south of China and Indonesia on the world map. It is considered to be the 6th largest country in the world in terms of land mass. Meanwhile Australia is also considered the smallest continent in the world. In 1945, Australia only had a population of about 7 million people. Since 1945 the country had gained another 6.5 million due to immigration for reasons such as escaping poverty, war and persecution. The immigrants have mainly come from the areas of Europe, Africa, Asia-Pacific, and the Middle East. Australia now prides itself on the diversification of these immigrants and their contributions that helped create the current culture. The current estimate on the population is now nearly 23 million with around 575,000 being that of the indigenous people. This total population is relatively small compared to the populations of all other inhibited continents (excluding Antarctica), but this country is has a larger economy than its population may suggest and is considered a first world country.…

    • 1350 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In the mid-1800s, New Zealand and Britain were two very different countries. While Britain was a flourishing country with big cities, tall buildings, a steadily growing population and civilised enough to have organised people into classes, in New Zealand the Maori had only settled three-hundred years earlier, the land was heavily forested, there was no major cities or towns and there was no money – only trade.…

    • 1066 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    These statements come to recall the real reason of this essay that is to show how the environments in different places can predict or determine what is going to happen in a continent in the future. In the Chatham Islands, the weather and the resources were a very important factor on its fate. Since the soil made it almost impossible to farm, they had to adapt to other forms of getting food in order to obtain their needs. Also, their isolation formed a big part of how they learned to adapt. They were not too close to any other island and they had no contact with any water-craft. In the other hand, the Maori were a strong and bigger community. They were located on the northern part of New Zealand and they were involved in more war-like problems. Their climate was more crop-friendly so it made it easier for them to plant.…

    • 389 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Tiwi: Traditions in Austrailia by Holly Peters-Golden covers the major points in the tribes lifestyle. She covers their social organization and their religious and expressive culture. Under social organization fell kinship, marriage, Tiwi wives, power and prestige; religious and expressive culture covered beliefs, taboos, kulama , sickness-reasons they became sick and how healing is common knowledge, death and pukamani .…

    • 1286 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The discovery and settlement of new land in the world often involve myths. Similarly, there have been different theories and controversies surrounding the discovery of and settlement of New Zealand by East Polynesians. East Polynesians can be defined as a distinct ethnic group inhabiting Pacific islands such as the Society, Marquesas and New Zealand. This essay will outline three issues, including the validity of the story of Kupe, whether the voyages to New Zealand were planned or accidental, and the time period of the arrival of the first settlers to New Zealand.…

    • 616 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    current position on the competitive scale, which shows they are the New Zealand leader in…

    • 6968 Words
    • 32 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Best Essays

    Australian Culture

    • 3188 Words
    • 13 Pages

    culture. For example, in Japan there is a strong belief that if one works hard, does…

    • 3188 Words
    • 13 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    bastion point essay

    • 440 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Misleading, unorganized and inconclusive are only a few words to describe the signing of the treaty of Waitangi on the 6th of February 1840. The 3 official articles released were so heavily rushed that the responses following have damaged the Maori & English’s relationship for good. These articles have almost completely different translations, and ownership rights unsettled- leaving the maori chiefs at the time confused and uneducated. The responses that followed included some violent and nonviolent that lasted between a few days and about 2 years. These were the Northern wars, and Bastion point.…

    • 440 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Kiwi is the national symbol of New Zealand. The Kiwi covers two thirds of the northern island of New Zealand. Kiwi is also a word to say New Zealanders. They are aggressive and will defend their territory from other kiwis. The Northern Island Brown Kiwi is critically endangered. There are only 2500 left and is also called as the least common kiwi. The brown kiwi prefers dense, sub-tropical and temperate forests.…

    • 351 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Fcom 111 Assi

    • 1781 Words
    • 8 Pages

    It is essential to have some idea about the Westminster government model first. The Westminster model, also called the majoritarian model, is a general model of democracy (Lijphart, 1999, p.9). There are many definitions for Westminster but this paper will follow the definition provided by Professor Chris Eichbaum (2010). The Westminster government model has six main features: the parliament is sovereign; the members of the Cabinet are also members of the Parliament; has a two-party dominant system in the parliament; use an electoral system that usually produces single-party majority government; members of the Cabinet have to have responsibility individually and collectively to the Parliament; and the public sector has to be independent of the Cabinet and politically neutral. And that is enough definition to move on to the specific case of New Zealand.…

    • 1781 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    - Eichbaum, C., Shaw, R. (2008). Public Policy in New Zealand. New Zealand: Pearson Education.…

    • 1802 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Maori Culture

    • 23110 Words
    • 93 Pages

    The importance of immersion in the tangata whenua language and cultural values – the way of expression of our respect. We have to treat each other as equal partners with mutual respect (Ki a koe tētehi kīwai, ki a au tētehi kīwai. For you one handle of the basket and for me the other.). The powhiri should be completed to enclose parties, but the affiliations of tangate ke remind temporary and artificial and it affects research outcomes. The commited stranger has reciprocal duty or obligation to those many tangata whenua who gave freely of their learning, Our work should enhance the oranga (well-being) of all.…

    • 23110 Words
    • 93 Pages
    Good Essays

Related Topics