Culture as a concept of Anthropology

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CULTURE AS A CONCEPT OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL RESEARCH

Put simply, anthropological research is the study of anthropology. “Anthropology is a comparative study of culture, society, and human difference. The field challenges us to consider the many ways in which people’s lives are shaped by social relations, cultural images, and historical forces”. (Biehl, J. G. (2004). Introduction to Anthropology.). By this we can see that as a whole, anthropology is the study of people and their behavior towards one another, the way they live their lives according to society and societies beliefs of how one should live as well as most of the time, the culture that they involve themselves in.
I would say that yes, culture does play an important role in anthropological research. This is because culture serves as a framework for which we are then able to study other people and the ways in which they live. “Anthropology is the study of humankind in all times and places.” (Prins, H. E., Walrath, D., & McBride, B. (2006). The Essence of Anthropology. Cengage Learning.). Anthropology is also something that can be used to study social interaction, which is the way that humans specifically, but also different mammals etc, interact with each other. It is a concept that is not closed, but rather one that is open. This means that the concept of culture is one that is not specified but rather one that is open for discussion and understanding.
“Globalization involves economic integration; the transfer of policies across borders; the transmission of knowledge; cultural stability; the reproduction, relations, and discourses of power; it is a global process, a concept, a revolution, and “an establishment of the global market free from sociopolitical control.” (Al-Rodhan, N. R., & Stoudmann, G. (2006). Definitions of globalization: A comprehensive overview and a proposed definition. Program on the Geopolitical Implications of Globalization and Transnational Security, 6.). Globalization is a way in

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