Crowdsourcing: Integrating the Society with Organizations

Topics: Crowdsourcing, Crowd, InnoCentive Pages: 10 (5412 words) Published: April 23, 2015


Crowdsourcing: Integrating the society with organizations…. By: Prashant Kumar

Introduction:

Organizations are not the genesis of society rather society is the genesis of organizations. Every organization work inside the periphery of the society which consist of big human capital, so it becomes quite inevitable for them to ignore such a large pool of stakeholders. Whatever organization does it directly or indirectly affects these stakeholders, so it is quite natural on the part of the organization to involve these stakeholders in the various activities of the organization and make them feel that they are part of it and they have a say in many decisions which will affect them in future. Through this writing I have tried to explore the world of crowdsourcing and answer following questions: 1. What is crowdsourcing ?

2. What is the background of crowdsourcing ?
3. What is the present status of crowdsourcing ?
4. What are the benefits, pitfalls and issues of concern about crowdsourcing ? 5. What is the future of crowdsourcing ?
6. Last but not the least: Conclusion (My views…)

Crowdsourcing:

The crowdsourcing process in eight steps. Crowdsourcing is a distributed problem-solving and production model. Problems are broadcast to an unknown group of solvers in the form of an open call for solutions. Users--also known as the crowd--typically form into online communities, and the crowd submits solutions. The crowd also sorts through the solutions, finding the best ones. These best solutions are then owned by the entity that broadcast the problem in the first place--the crowdsourcer--and the winning individuals in the crowd are sometimes rewarded. In some cases, this labor is well compensated, either monetarily, with prizes, or with recognition. In other cases, the only rewards may be kudos or intellectual satisfaction. Crowdsourcing may produce solutions from amateurs or volunteers working in their spare time, or from experts or small businesses which were unknown to the initiating organization.

Many Man…Many Minds. As crowdsourcing is still in the nascent stage and evolving, there are many definitions of crowdsourcing. We will study some of them…

The term "crowdsourcing" is a portmanteau of "crowd" and "outsourcing"; it is distinguished from outsourcing in that the work comes from an undefined public rather than being commissioned from a specific, named group. Jeff Howe and Mark Robinson, editors at Wired Magazine, coined the term "crowdsourcing" in 2005 after conversations about how businesses were using the Internet to outsource work to individuals. Howe and Robinson came to the conclusion that what was happening was like "outsourcing to the crowd," which quickly led to the portmanteau "crowdsourcing.

"Simply defined, crowdsourcing represents the act of a company or institution taking a function once performed by employees and outsourcing it to an undefined (and generally large) network of people in the form of an open call. This can take the form of peer-production (when the job is performed collaboratively), but is also often undertaken by sole individuals. The crucial prerequisite is the use of the open call format and the large network of potential laborers."

In a February 1, 2008 article, Daren C. Brabham, "the first [person] to publish scholarly research using the word crowdsourcing" and writer of the 2013 book, Crowdsourcing, defined it as an "online, distributed problem-solving and production model. In crowdsourcing, problems are broadcast to the public in the form of an open call for solutions. Members of the public submit solutions which are then owned by the entity which broadcast the problem. In some cases, the contributor of the solution is compensated monetarily, with prizes or with recognition. In other cases, the only rewards may be kudos or intellectual satisfaction. Crowdsourcing may produce solutions from amateurs or volunteers, working in their spare time, or from...

References: 1. Cbsnews.com
2. Chinavalue.net
3. Wikipedia.com
4. Archive.wired.com
5. Dailycrowdsource.com
6. Inc.com
7. Fastcompany.com
8. Mashable.com
9. Mindjumpers.com
10. AllFacebook.com
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Essay on Crowdsourcing
  • Crowdsourcing Essay
  • Crowdsourcing Essay
  • Crowdsourcing Essay
  • Crowdsourcing Essay
  • Crowdsourcing Essay
  • Essay about Value of Business Organization in Society
  • The Implications of Downsizing for the Workforce, the Organizations, and the Society Essay

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free