Critical Period Hypothesis

Powerful Essays
Los Niños Saben Mas Que Tu
If all of the schools in the United States changed the curriculum to teaching Spanish in elementary schools, then everyone reading this paper would know exactly what that title means. Children have inquisitive minds that are open to what the world has in store for them, making the environment seem untouched and extraordinary. That’s why kids with parents that speak a different language than the mother language picks up on the lingo so quickly. Children have porous minds, and vivid memories because their brains are so spongey, they absorb everything that is shown to them. Introducing Spanish during the golden years will cause every child to be bilingual for the rest of their lives. Implementing Spanish into the elementary curricular system is a great opportunity to adopt
…show more content…
Developing a new language is not easy, but to a child just learning the basics of English has an advantage by their brain accepting new grammar rules and pronunciation at a more rapid pace. Phonics become easier and is less complicated to understand as a young child. There are multiple theories describing how a little kids brain is more developed in learning complex subjects when compared to adult minds. The Critical Period Hypothesis “is a period during the early life of a [human] when some property develops rapidly, and is more susceptible to alteration by the environment” (Daw 1). Noam Chomsky proposed a language acquisition device in the brain that helps children naturally or automatically pick up the language but switches of as an adult (Wen 149). There are children in parts of the world that pick up more than three or four languages. Kids pick up dialects without any awareness that they are speaking a different language. The child’s brain is just registering: this is how you talk to your mom, this is how you talk to your grandma, and this is how you talk to your

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Lenneberg formed the Critical Period Hypothesis theory which contends that language is innate but has to be attained before the age of puberty or else the ability to learn language ebbs (as a result of the lateralization of the brain). 1 At present, the Critical Period Hypothesis theory is widely accepted by numerous linguists. Evidence has been presented that there is a limited time when the brain is malleable (in terms of language). Studies such as, linguistically isolated children (a.k.a. feral…

    • 859 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    sensitive period, that is a phase during development when learning a particular skill can occur more effectively than later on in life, is well known in nature. A few examples are imprinting in ducks and song learning for songbirds (Clark 2009). The sensitive period is sometimes regarded as critical, implying that, once it is past, that specific skill can no longer be learnt. The idea that human language is normally acquired during a critical period was proposed by Lenneberg with the Critical Period…

    • 1173 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Critical Hypothesis

    • 9662 Words
    • 39 Pages

    2009, Vol. 9, No. 1 The Critical Period Hypothesis: Support, Challenge, and Reconceptualization The Critical Period Hypothesis: Support, Challenge, and Reconceptualization Andy Schouten1 Kanda University of International Studies ABSTRACT Given the general failure experienced by adults when attempting to learn a second or foreign language, many have hypothesized that a critical period exists for the domain of language learning. Supporters of the Critical Period Hypothesis (CPH) contend that language…

    • 9662 Words
    • 39 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Critical Period

    • 559 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Critical Period and Language Acquisition Part of the reason why Genie's case fascinated psychologists and linguists so deeply was that it presented a unique opportunity to study a hotly contested debate about language development. Nativists believe that the capacity for language is innate, while empiricists suggest that it is environmental variables that play a key role. Essentially, it boils down to the age-old nature versus nurture debate. Do genetics or environment play a greater role in the…

    • 559 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Critical Period

    • 636 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Mr. McKee AP US History December 7, 2012 The Critical Period was one of the most essential times in the history of the United States. The ideas that the colonists were fighting for during the Revolutionary War were being put to the test to see if they could actually be enacted in a running government. The critical period consisted of a power struggle between the states and the central government for the balance of sovereignty. The Critical Period was the launch of the way that our country runs…

    • 636 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    |16 - 17 | Article Background Author: Andy Schouten Title of the article: The Critical Period Hypothesis: Support, Challenge and Reconceptualization Name of journal: The Critical Period Hypothesis Date/year of publication: 2009 General introduction of the article What is the article about? It is generally agreed…

    • 4064 Words
    • 17 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Constitutional Period/Critical Period/Federalist Period 1783-1800 By Emily Rose, Rachel Brunsman, and Stephanie Fullenwider Overview Ending the American Revolution, the Treaty of Paris was signed in 1783. During the war, the Articles of Confederation had been drafted, creating a confederation out of the colonies for the first time. Under the Articles, the government could not raise an army or tax. It also lacked centralized power because of the absence of an executive branch. The only strong…

    • 6730 Words
    • 27 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Critical Period Dbq

    • 620 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Critical Period DBQ In the United States from 1781 to 1789 the Articles of Confederation was the main form of government. Although the document established a national government, a legislative branch, and land expansion to the west, it still had major weaknesses. There were weaknesses in the social, political, and economical forms of the government. The articles failed to efficiently regulate trade, levy taxes, and predominantly enforce the laws that were written. The Articles of Confederation…

    • 620 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Hypothesis testing using the binomial distribution Chapter assessment 1. Sweets called “Scruffies” are sold in packets of 18. Scruffies come in a variety of colours, and market research shows that red is the most popular. Scruffies are packed randomly, and on average 25% are red. (i) Find the probability that a packet contains no more than 6 red Scruffies. [2] (ii) Find the probability that a packet contains exactly 4 red Scruffies. [2] Because of a fault in the packing machine…

    • 1190 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Critical-Value Approach to Hypothesis Testing We often use inferential statistics to make decisions or judgments about the value of a parameter, such as a population mean. For example, we might need to decide whether the mean weight, μ, of all bags of pretzels packaged by a particular company differs from the advertised weight of 454 grams (g), or we might want to determine whether the mean age, μ, of all cars in use has increased from the year 2000 mean of 9.0 years. One of the most commonly…

    • 467 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays