Critical Period

Satisfactory Essays
Melissa Kabb
Mr. McKee
AP US History
December 7, 2012

The Critical Period was one of the most essential times in the history of the United States. The ideas that the colonists were fighting for during the Revolutionary War were being put to the test to see if they could actually be enacted in a running government. The critical period consisted of a power struggle between the states and the central government for the balance of sovereignty. The Critical Period was the launch of the way that our country runs today. The Articles of Confederation was the first set of terms that were adopted for the United States in 1781, however, there were many problems that arose with it. Congress had to get approval from 9 of 13 states before laws could be passed and all 13 states had to have a unanimous vote before any changes could be made to the Articles. Obviously, getting either of these two things done would be virtually impossible. In the Articles, the states were said to have entered a firm league of friendship while in actually, each state was thinking of itself as its own separate nation and doing things to only benefit themselves. These thoughts led to what some call a Dis-United States of America. Even though these two factors, along with many others not mentioned, make the Articles seem as if they were a disaster for the country, they did help to bring about a sense of national unity resulting from the separation with Britain. An event that had a tremendous impact during the Critical Period was Shays’ Rebellion. The leader of the rebellion was a farmer by the name of Daniel Shays. He and many other farmers were victims of high debt as they were trying to start new farms in Western Massachusetts. The rebels wanted the Massachusetts government to pass a law that would forgive any debts that they had and print more paper money that would help debt stay down. In response to the rebellion, Thomas Jefferson stated that “a little rebellion now and then is a good thing”.

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Critical Period

    • 559 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Critical Period and Language Acquisition Part of the reason why Genie's case fascinated psychologists and linguists so deeply was that it presented a unique opportunity to study a hotly contested debate about language development. Nativists believe that the capacity for language is innate, while empiricists suggest that it is environmental variables that play a key role. Essentially, it boils down to the age-old nature versus nurture debate. Do genetics or environment play a greater role in the…

    • 559 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Lenneberg formed the Critical Period Hypothesis theory which contends that language is innate but has to be attained before the age of puberty or else the ability to learn language ebbs (as a result of the lateralization of the brain). 1 At present, the Critical Period Hypothesis theory is widely accepted by numerous linguists. Evidence has been presented that there is a limited time when the brain is malleable (in terms of language). Studies such as, linguistically isolated children (a.k.a. feral…

    • 859 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Constitutional Period/Critical Period/Federalist Period 1783-1800 By Emily Rose, Rachel Brunsman, and Stephanie Fullenwider Overview Ending the American Revolution, the Treaty of Paris was signed in 1783. During the war, the Articles of Confederation had been drafted, creating a confederation out of the colonies for the first time. Under the Articles, the government could not raise an army or tax. It also lacked centralized power because of the absence of an executive branch. The only strong…

    • 6730 Words
    • 27 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Critical Period Hypothesis

    • 1558 Words
    • 7 Pages

    rapid pace. Phonics become easier and is less complicated to understand as a young child. There are multiple theories describing how a little kids brain is more developed in learning complex subjects when compared to adult minds. The Critical Period Hypothesis “is a period during the early life of a [human] when some property develops rapidly, and is more susceptible to alteration by the environment” (Daw 1). Noam Chomsky proposed a language acquisition device in the brain that helps children naturally…

    • 1558 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Critical Period Dbq

    • 620 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Critical Period DBQ In the United States from 1781 to 1789 the Articles of Confederation was the main form of government. Although the document established a national government, a legislative branch, and land expansion to the west, it still had major weaknesses. There were weaknesses in the social, political, and economical forms of the government. The articles failed to efficiently regulate trade, levy taxes, and predominantly enforce the laws that were written. The Articles of Confederation…

    • 620 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    sensitive period, that is a phase during development when learning a particular skill can occur more effectively than later on in life, is well known in nature. A few examples are imprinting in ducks and song learning for songbirds (Clark 2009). The sensitive period is sometimes regarded as critical, implying that, once it is past, that specific skill can no longer be learnt. The idea that human language is normally acquired during a critical period was proposed by Lenneberg with the Critical Period…

    • 1173 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Critical Period and the Age of Jefferson Definitions: 1. Federalist Party – The Federalist Party was led by Alexander Hamilton. They thought that the federal government should have more power than the individual state government. 2. The Democratic-Republicans – Led by Jefferson and Madison, believed the individual state should have more power and the federal government should have less. 3. Jay Treaty – Ended all tension between Britain and America, and formed a trade agreement among the…

    • 731 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The time period between 1781 and 1789 is often referred to as the "Critical Period", and with a good reason. As a newly formed country America had a lot to lose if it did not survive and prove its self to the world as well as the citizens. Going into the critical period the United States was run under the Articles of Confederation but the lack of a centralized government soon proved the articles to be inept. The Problems with the Articles appeared almost upon completion. The fact that full state…

    • 354 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    the question “are there critical periods for the development of social competency?” one must first clearly define the key elements of the question. A critical period is defined as a time when a certain development must happen if it is to ever happen (Strassen Berger, 2006). In psychology the term is most often associated with language acquisition as the critical period hypothesis popularised by Lenneberg (1967) hypothesised that language learned outside the critical period for language learning would…

    • 1555 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Critical Period The critical point in a developing fetus falls roughly within the 5th week and the 6th month. This period is defined as the critical period because beginning around the 5th week tissue begins to differentiate. This specialized tissue starts developing from the top down. Specialized tissues begin forming limbs and digits from the top of the fetus and working its way down to its limbs. Any agent that causes a birth defect is called a teratogen. Teratogens can vary from chemicals…

    • 1176 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays