Critical Analysic Paper

Topics: American Revolutionary War, United States, American Revolution Pages: 8 (2122 words) Published: April 16, 2015
Kieu Anh Hoang
Ms. Sheryl Ballard
History 1301
7th Feb, 2015

Revolutionary Mothers: Women in the Struggle for America's Independence by Carol Berkin (New York: Knopf Publishing Group, 2005). 194pp. Reviewed by Kieu Anh Hoang, Feb 1st, 2015
Carol Berkin was born in Mobile, Alabama, but educated in New York City. She received her bachelor’s degree from Barnard College. Her M.A and PhD were from Columbia University where she won the Bancroft Award for Outstanding Dissertation, and also she was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize with her subsequent book: Jonathan Sewall: Odyssey of An American Loyalist. Now, at Baruch College, she is Presidential Professor of History, and a member of CUNY Graduate Center’s history faculty. She is a pioneer and expert in early women’s history of colonial American. Also she is the author, and editor, who has written widely on the subject, and published several of readers, textbooks, and teaching guides: Women of America: A History (1980), Brilliant Solution: Inventing the American Constitution (2001), which was one of her most popular works, has been translated into Chinese and Polish, Revolutionary Mothers: Women in the Struggle for American Independence (2005), and Clio in the Classroom: A guide to teaching Women’s History (2009). She has two secondary school textbooks, American History, and a college Making America textbook. In addition, Professor Berkin has worked for numerous history channel documentaries, including the programs, The “Scottsboro Boys,” which was an Academy Award’ nomination for the best documentary of 2000, some series: “New York: A Documentary Film,” by Ric Burns, “Alexander Hamilton,” “Benjamin Franklin,” and “The Founding Fathers.”

Professor Berkin had grown up in Alabama, and her life was fulfilled with the Civil War- or the War of Northern Aggression. Therefore, when she reached college in New York City, she was helped by three of the most astonishing history professors: Sidney Burrell, Norman Cantor, and Annette Baxter. She found the appeals of the 20th century American history, which lacked the mystery and novelty, was more interesting than the rest, especially the 19th one. She was directly attracted by the era’s colony and its dramatic climax, when there was a revolution. At her grad school’s time, in the Stone Age, no one even considered that women would be a field to study in the future, so did she. She worked on a male Loyalist dissertation, but later, when she began teaching, she changed her mind. Her women colleagues and she had started to ask bunches of exhilarating questions about their gender in the past: Where were the women in their account of the past? How would picture change if they looked at events through a gendered lens? Those questions caused her a lot of thinking, but deepened when her daughter was born, Mrs. Berkin commitment to early American women’s history studying. After three decades swirling in her head, the book was finally worked on. Because she wanted her daughter could look into the mirror studying of the past, reflect herself in there, and discover the world. Therefore, she had the inspiration to research, write to insure, and publish it to everybody, especial for her children.

In the book, Revolutionary Mothers: Women in the Struggle for America’s Independence, Carol Berkin’s studying shows the life of a woman in the eighteen century was very different from now. During the Revolution era, if people emphasize man as a braver fought for his country’s freedom, the image of a woman is greatly minimized. Even though, both men and women were involving in the military, and playing an active and vital role, women’s contributions for our nation were completely left out. To prove that, Professor Berkin not only focuses on lower but also higher social class such as: Colonial white women, African-Americans, and Native Americans. She looks at the women whom she writes with admired eyes because of their qualities like: physical...

Bibliography: Harrigan, Diane. "Carol Berkin: History’s Advocate." Carol Berkin: Historys Advocate. Web. 12 Feb. 2015.
"Biography." IMDb. IMDb.com. Web. 12 Feb. 2015.
Pela, Robrt. "The Salon: Writing History 's Heroines." The Salon: Writing History 's Heroines. 3 Oct. 2014. Web. 12 Feb. 2015.
Hattem, Michael. "Interviews with Historians: Carol Berkin." The Junto. 17 Dec. 2013. Web. 12 Feb. 2015.
Berkin, Carol. "The Easy Tak of Obeying." Revolutionary Mothers: Women in the Struggle for America 's Independence. 1st ed. Vol. 1. New York: Knopf :, 2005. 3-11. Print.
Berkin, Carol. "They Say It Is Tea That Caused It." Revolutionary Mothers: Women in the Struggle for America 's Independence. 1st ed. Vol. 2. New York: Knopf :, 2005. 12-25. Print.
Berkin, Carol. "You Can Form No Idea of the Horrors." Revolutionary Mothers: Women in the Struggle for America 's Independence. 1st ed. Vol. 3. New York: Knopf :, 2005. 27-49. Print.
Berkin, Carol. "Such A Sordid Set of Creatures in Human Figure." Revolutionary Mothers: Women in the Struggle for America 's Independence. 1st ed. Vol. 4. New York: Knopf :, 2005. 50-66. Print.
Berkin, Carol. "How Unhappy Is War to Domestic Happiness." Revolutionary Mothers: Women in the Struggle for America 's Independence. 1st ed. Vol. 5. New York: Knopf :, 2005. 67-91. Print.
Berkin, Carol. "A Hourney Across Ye Wilderness." Revolutionary Mothers: Women in the Struggle for America 's Independence. 1st ed. Vol. 6. New York: Knopf :, 2005. 92-106. Print.
Berkin, Carol. "The Women Must Hear Our Words." Revolutionary Mothers: Women in the Struggle for America 's Independence. 1st ed. Vol. 7. New York: Knopf :, 2005. 107-120. Print.
Berkin, Carol. "The Day of Jubilee Is Come." Revolutionary Mothers: Women in the Struggle for America 's Independence. 1st ed. Vol.8 . New York: Knopf :, 2005. 135-147. Print.
Berkin, Carol. "It Was I Who Did It." Revolutionary Mothers: Women in the Struggle for America 's Independence. 1st ed. Vol. 9. New York: Knopf :, 2005.148 -162. Print.
Berkin, Carol. "Ther Is No Sex In Soul." Revolutionary Mothers: Women in the Struggle for America 's Independence. 1st ed. Vol. 10. New York: Knopf :, 2005. 163-174. Print.
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