crime of compassion

Satisfactory Essays
A Crime of Compassion
A Crime of Compassion by Barbara Huttmann is a story between a nurse and the patient’s wishes to die. The story is about Mac who was a cop that came into the hospital complaining about a cough that seems hard to get rid of. Later test confirmed that he had lung cancer that leads him to be confinement to the hospital. After six months, he lost his hair, bone and youth. Due to his condition, It was normal for Mac to trigger a code blue which announce a patient life is threaten at least once a day. The story also tells about the pain and his wish to die. Unfortunately, his doctor believes that life should be prolonging regardless of the patient’s wishes. One day, when Barbara was bathing Mac and later giving pain medication. She heard Mac moaned “Pain …. No more... Barbara… do something…. God, let me go”. That was when Barbara decided to grant his wishes and let Mac dies.
Respond:
Huttmann was motivated to do what she did due to her realization that we don’t have the right to prolong the patient’s pain regardless of what means we have to prolong life. A Crime of Compassion
A Crime of Compassion by Barbara Huttmann is a story between a nurse and the patient’s wishes to die. The story is about Mac who was a cop that came into the hospital complaining about a cough that seems hard to get rid of. Later test confirmed that he had lung cancer that leads him to be confinement to the hospital. After six months, he lost his hair, bone and youth. Due to his condition, It was normal for Mac to trigger a code blue which announce a patient life is threaten at least once a day. The story also tells about the pain and his wish to die. Unfortunately, his doctor believes that life should be prolonging regardless of the patient’s wishes. One day, when Barbara was bathing Mac and later giving pain medication. She heard Mac moaned “Pain …. No more... Barbara… do something…. God, let me go”. That was when Barbara decided to grant his wishes and let Mac dies.

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Many people all over the world are suffering from diseases. Diseases such as multiple sclerosis, cancer, parkinson's disease, heart disease and many others. Suffering from diseases not only effects the person suffering but the families and even our health care system. Suffering at the end of our lives has become an acceptable part of life in many parts of the world. This documentary, How to die in Oregon, explores: the issue and the laws of the right to choose when to die, the three main drugs used for this procedure, how medicare will pay for this drug before they will chemotherapy- something that may prolong life, the number of people who have used this drug,and the fact that they can get this drug even if they do not plan to use it. This paper will use the information from this documentary as the basis of an ethical examination of the laws in place for the one's who suffer. First, I will briefly…

    • 731 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The patient chosen for this essay is a sixty year old man. This patient was one of the palliative care patients that the team of district nurses I was allocated to work with in my community placement care for. The patient has terminal liver cancer. The patient lives with his wife whom is his main carer. The district nurses had to visit him every day of the week. The patient had a syringe driver on situ which needed to be filled with a new dose of medication every 24 hours. Also the extension set needed to be changed to the other side of the patient’s body when the side it was on became sore. The main care needs for the patient were to palliate physical symptoms and maintain independence for as long and as comfortably as possible.…

    • 3442 Words
    • 14 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Physician Assisted Suicide

    • 2492 Words
    • 10 Pages

    In the medical field there are massive amounts of treatments for various diseases. Some treatments are going to help the patient feel more comfortable; however, some are going to counteract the problem, and others are going to help kill the patient. Physician assisted suicide is defined by medterms.com as “the voluntary termination of one 's own life by administration of a lethal substance with the direct or indirect assistance of a physician.” Any person wishing to undergo assisted suicide in Oregon must be at least 18 years of age and have a terminal illness. This illness must be within its final stages and leave the patient with less than six months to live. Within these six months a patient can request the treatment, but must orally request twice, and provide a written request once as well. In order to receive this treatment, however, a second physician must give a second opinion on the length the patient has to live. In her article, “Physician-Assisted Suicide: Compassionate Liberation or Murder?” Vicki Lachman talks about the option that patients have to request a lethal dosage of medication. She explores the moral conscience of nurses, the ethical and moral issues, and the legal issues that surround a patient’s request for lethal dosages.…

    • 2492 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Hca 322 Week 5 Final

    • 3435 Words
    • 14 Pages

    “Aid in dying” is the most extensive idea of assisting someone to die. One component of this extensive idea is physician assisted death. Physician assisted death includes all of the types of euthanasia such as, active and passive euthanasia, which can be either voluntary or involuntary. A small subset of physician assisted death is physician assisted suicide (PAS). The concept of PAS covers a range of activities. On one end of the spectrum, there is the model used in Oregon; whereas the physician screens those who are seeking to commit suicide and, after determining the mental state, desire, and medical condition of the patient, assists in dying by writing a prescription for a lethal drug overdose. On the other end of the PAS spectrum is the active participation of a physician in assisting the patient by starting an intravenous solution and thereby more directly providing the means by which a patient can initiate the final act of committing suicide (Breitbart, 2012). Though seldom discussed, it is widely understood that the principal role of the physician is to “comfort always,” a role especially important when all hope to benefit from further treatment has faded. This ethic has never included assisting in suicide. When eliminating pain requires large amounts of morphine, unintended death in palliative treatment to provide comfort care raises few ethical, or legal, concerns. Almost certainly, physicians and other caregivers sometimes listen to the pleas of severe pain stricken patients to help them die, or solely from compassionate impulses they occasionally perform involuntary, active euthanasia on a medically hopeless patient who can no longer communicate (Sullivan, 2011). Indeed, both legal counsel and the healthcare administrators that provide advice must understand the legal and ethical implications of issues…

    • 3435 Words
    • 14 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Hat1 Task 2

    • 2593 Words
    • 11 Pages

    Nurses in a palliative care situation have multiple roles which range from a clinical technician to a shoulder to cry on. They advocate for the friends and family of the dying patient and educate all on positive ways to grieve. The main concerns of these nurses are centered on the promotion of comfort, quality of life and preserving the patient’s dignity. Because each patient approaches death differently, the nurse must alter their care plan accordingly.…

    • 2593 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    My essay topic is whether or not physician assisted suicide is morally permissible. I intend to argue that it is permissible because a competent patient ultimately has the right to choose for themselves the course of their life, including how it will end. To lie in a hospital bed in a vegetative state, unable to see, think, speak, eat, being totally unaware of your surroundings or those of your loved ones nearby speaks loudly of the pain and suffering at all levels for a terminally ill patient. Physician assisted suicide (PAS) is ethically justifiable in certain cases, most often those cases involving unrelenting suffering. While PAS is not legal in the United States, the Supreme Court has upheld individual states right to decide on the legality of it. The debate for PAS has been going for many centuries and the most common reason for the request of PAS were wanting to die in a dignified way, being in pain, being dependable on others for personal care, being tired of life and fearing future loss of control. PAS may be a rational choice for a person who is choosing to die to escape unbearable suffering and the physicians’ duty to alleviate suffering may, at times, justify the act of providing assistance with suicide. However, others have argued that PAS is unethical and runs directly counter to the traditional duty of the physician to preserve life. Furthermore, many argue if PAS were legal, abuses would take place.…

    • 1780 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Patel, A.Y., (2012). Suicide by Do-Not-Resuscitate Order. American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, 00(0), 1-3. Doi: 10.1177/1049909112438461.…

    • 2495 Words
    • 72 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Physician Assisted Suicide

    • 1248 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Physician Assisted Death is an extraordinary issue that is difficult to talk about. I, myself found it difficult to research for this paper for two reasons. The first being that I’ve affected by suicide and numerous…

    • 1248 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Physician-assisted suicide raises many ethical and moral issues. For patients who advocate for PAS, they acknowledged that the act promotes human dignity, autonomy, and is a humanizing act to end their suffering. PAS is an act of healing for the terminal sick to help end their daily struggles and many see it as a dignified choice. It is evident from patients’ voice and Dr. Byock testimonials strikes the heart of the senseless need to keep the terminal ill alive. Along with the inevitable deaths comes costly medical expenses that can better serve to improve the country and the communities’ welfare.…

    • 188 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Death is highly relevant to nursing as the nursing staff faces the death of a patient almost every day (depends on the department they are in). The debate against hiding patient’s prognosis to informing them must be greatly considered. Before considering such action, nurses need to know what is best for the patient and what constitutes a good death. The representation of a good death is when one is relief of symptoms, open communication is present, the individual dignity, respect and acceptance of death (Costello, 2015). Although a representation of a good death requires an open communication. Revealing a bad diagnosis to a patient is better done by the doctors. 95% healthcare professionals strongly disagreed that nurses be allowed to give that…

    • 1120 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The audience first meets Mac when he was a, “young, witty, macho cop who walked into the hospital with 32 pounds of attack equipment” (Huttman 1). The exaggeration of the amount of equipment Mac carries creates the image that Mac is powerful and can win any battle that threatens him. By lifting Mac so high at first, his decline in health is more striking to the audience. This hyperbole allows doctors or lawyers who oppose euthanasia to see how the treatment for patients can cause more pain than aid. Mac comes in to the hospital to try to get rid of a simple cough, but, “before the day was over, tests confirmed that he had lung cancer. And before the year was over, [Huttman] loved him, his wife, Maura, and their three kids as if they were [her] own” (Huttman 1). In the above quote, the phrases “before the day was over” and “before the year was over” are parallel and are both followed by simple ideas: “he had lung cancer” and “I loved him”. The use of parallel structure establishes balance and flow and refutes opposers of euthanasia who say that it is murder. By demonstrating the love between the patient and the nurse, claims of murder are discredited and Huttman’s message that euthanasia should be a solution to suffering patients can be proven. As the essay goes on, Huttman continues to use rhetorical devices to get her message…

    • 1028 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    It is a necessity that nurses recognize their own feelings regarding death and dying and have a strong ethical framework in order to support the end-of-life wishes of their patients (Butts & Rich, 2013). Even if one is resolute in their own moral standing, cases such as Mr. T.’s may be emotionally exhausting.…

    • 478 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    A Person's Right to Die

    • 953 Words
    • 3 Pages

    In the majority of cases, people die in hospitals where physicians and nurses make heroic efforts to keep patients alive until there is no reasonable chance for their recovery. Unfortunately, in the course of those valiant efforts, pain, suffering, and the wishes of patients and their families are often overlooked as physicians and staff struggle with medical, moral, legal, and economic matters. In most cases, medical professionals have significant discretion in deciding when additional efforts to sustain life are futile, and a patient should be allowed to die.…

    • 953 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Lorraine Bayless, an 87 year old woman, collapsed in the dining room of Glenwood Gardens Retirement Center in Bakersfield, CA, USA in 2013 March. As she lay dying on the floor, a nurse called 911 for help, but firmly refused to perform CPR, even with the dispatcher begging her to do so, because it was “against the company’s policy”. After nearly seven minutes of arguing, paramedics finally arrived to take the patient to the hospital, but it was too late.…

    • 113 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    End-of-life Care

    • 819 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The debate arises within those conflicts; the ANA Code of Ethics binds nurses to respect the autonomy of each patient and their decision to choose the healthcare options they believe are correct for them based on their religious, social, cultural and personal desires for end-of –life care (ANA Code of Ethics 2001). Nurses are also bound to participate in advocating for the patient to alleviate unnecessary treatment for the patient who has designated they do not want treatments that doctors and/or families may be advocating for the patient against that patients wishes (ANA Code of Ethics 2001). The nurse must be familiar with the end-of-life wishes of their patients otherwise; the patient looses a valuable advocate to assist in achieving their goals for end-of-life care. Nurses must also be aware of their own personal values and beliefs surrounding end-of-life care for their patients’ choices to advocate adequately.…

    • 819 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays