creole democracy by Rufino Blanco-Fombona

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Was born at Caracas, in Venezuela, in 1874. He comes of an old and aristocratic family of Spanish, descent. His extraordinary activities, not only as a writer, but as politician, revolutionary soldier, and government employee, together with his picturesque personal exploits, have all contributed to make him one ofthe most interesting figures in the Spanish-American world. He has traveled in many parts of the world. His writings include criticism,
Poetry, political essays, novels, and short stories. His first collection of tales appeared in 1900. Of Creole Democracy, perhaps his finest short story, Dr. Goldberg has said that "not many tales that have come out of South America can match it.”The present version, revised from an earlier version, is here printed by permission of the translator, Isaac Goldberg.
--Venezuelan poet, essayist and novelist, one of the leaders of Modernismo. Active in Venezuelan political affairs, he lived exiliated many years in Europe and contributed to spread the knowledge of Spanish American literature abroad. His poems, as the collection "Cantos de la Prisión y del Destierro" are better than his novels. Among his novels are "El Hombre de Hierro" and "El Hombre de Oro." Also a politician, during the II Spanish Republic, he was Governator of the Provinces of Almería (1932) and Navarra (1933.) (bio by:380W)
-- Rufino Blanco-Fombona, (b. June 17, 1874, Caracas, Venezuela²d. October 17, 1944, Buenos Aires, Argentina), Venezuelan literary historian and man of letters who played a major role in bringing the works of Latin American writers to world attention. Jailed during the early years of the dictatorship (1908-35) of Juan Vicente Gómez, Blanco-Fombona fled to Europe, where he established Editorial América in Madrid (1914), which presented Latin American writers to the European literary world. A prolific author, he wrote poetry, short stories, novels, and essays. Of Blanco-Fombona’s vast output,his literary essays are considered

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