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Corrupted Corn In The Omnivore's Dilemma Pollan

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Corrupted Corn In The Omnivore's Dilemma Pollan
Corrupted Corn
Grocery stores are guilty. They have stooped to prioritizing speed and quantity over quality. In The Omnivore's Dilemma Pollan aggressively attacked to reveal the evilness the food industry has been striving to hide. His vexation is clearly shown in his thesis "But forgetting, or not knowing in the first place, is what the industrial food chain is all about, the principal reason it is so opaque, for if we could see what lies on the far side of the increasingly high walls of our industrial agriculture, we would surely change the way we eat" (Pollan10-11).
Corn's cunning contrivance is deceiving and has gone undetected by most American families who just want to eat for an affordable price. Grocery stores are falsely sundry. While

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