A component in the development in Operation “Save the Congo” that we will focus lies in the Health infrastructure. The Democratic Republic of Congo was one of the first African countries to recognize HIV, registering cases as early as 1983. The most common method of transferring the virus occurs through homosexual activity; linking to over 87% cases in the Congo. Demographically, the ages groups most affected are women aged 20 to about 29 and men alike aged 30 to 39. Other method that contribute to the rampant spread of the virus are the large movement of refugees and soldiers; seeing as though population movements are often associated with the exacerbation of the HIV virus as it is now localized in areas most populated by troops and in other war-displaced populations. In addition, there is the increased levels of sexual transmitted diseases among sex workers and clientele alike, due to the limited availability of condoms in the country. All in all, without the relief of Operation “Save the Congo” the continuing problem of HIV/AIDS in the Democratic Republic of Congo becomes a leading issue in a country already suffering from other health issues. Along with the spread of the HIV virus, the impact that malaria has on the Democratic Republic of Congo is profound, and this is due to the expansion by insects and the fact that malaria is the primary cause of mortality among pregnant women and young children. On average, there are five million cases of malaria every year in the Congo and around 500,000 to one million people die of this disease every year. In addition, 97% of the country’s 70 million inhabitants live in areas where malaria is deeply concentrated, subjecting most of inhabitants with the vicious disease. Mosquitoes are the primary carriers of malaria, and due to the fact that Congo is located close to the equator, one can assume that the high number of mosquito presence is chiefly due to the humid climate of the country. Along with the expansion of

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Congo Paternalism

    • 717 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The Republic of the Congo began as a Belgian colony in the late 19th century. Belgium’s King Leopold II, after becoming increasingly frustrated by Belgium's lack of international power, began to persuade his government to support colonial expansion. His attention was drawn to the area of the Congo River basin following during Sir Henry Morton Stanley’s exploration from 1874–77. King Leopold II organized a geographical conference in Brussels in 1876, during which he proposed “establishing an international…

    • 717 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Congo Imperialism

    • 674 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The story of the Democratic Republic of Congo starts off with King Leopold II, the King of Belgium from 1865-1909. King Leopold II was extremely interested in making Belgium a world power, and did so by imperialism and colonization. In 1885, he made possible the formation of the Congo Free State (now known as the Democratic Republic of Congo) (Hochschild). This state was originally created as a way to open up the interior of Africa to European trade, specifically for ivory, which was extremely valuable…

    • 674 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The History of the Congo

    • 481 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire) is a nation in central Africa and the third largest country on the continent of Africa. It borders the Central African Republic and Sudan on the north, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, and Tanzania on the east, Zambia and Angola on the south, and the Republic of the Congo on the west. The name "Congo", which means "hunter" is derived from the Bakongo tribe, living in the Congo river basin. Formerly, the Belgian colony of the Belgian Congo, the country's post-independence…

    • 481 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Globalization and the Congo The article “Globalization, water, and the Congo” tackles the negative effects of globalization in the Congo. Some of these negatives include the sourcing of weapons from foreign entities, or the need of companies to acquire rare natural resources to fuel the ever increasing demand for their electronic products by the global village. Other more indirect effects of globalization are also covered, like the shortage of clean water and why simple fixes to this crisis are…

    • 652 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    the Belgian Congo

    • 985 Words
    • 3 Pages

    the Belgian Congo, now known as the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Located in Central Africa, the Belgian Congo was colonized by the Belgians in the late 19th century and was given independence in 1960, followed by a long period of strife and internal conflict. Its seeds were sown in 1885, when King Leopold II of Belgium acquired the area under pretensions of humanitarianism in the famous Berlin Conference. He ruled the Congo personally as a corporate state, and made a fortune by forcing villages…

    • 985 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Imperialism in the Congo

    • 1007 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Evaluate the impact of European imperialism on the Congo Free State in the early 20th century. Between the years of 1884 and up until 1959 the Congo Free State (CFS) was extensively impacted by imperialism form the European nation of Belgium. King Leopold II was the main influence and dictator of the CFS. Leopold’s intentions at the beginning of his enquiries to colonise the CFS seemed favourable of the Congolese however this did not play out as Leopold began break promises of decrees, exploit the…

    • 1007 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The DR of Congo

    • 264 Words
    • 1 Page

    The DR of Congo The DR of Congo is a country that has many resources. It has a large source of water available as it has in its territory one of the largest river in the world, it is also a source of many different minerals, it has rich soils used for plantations and it is also a source of rubber. All this resources would have made it into one of the most rich and developed countries in the world but this was all ruined when colonialism took place. They saw the locals as a source of slaves. The…

    • 264 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Congo Interpretation

    • 459 Words
    • 2 Pages

    which you can find here. The following is a bit about this poem and possible racism. “The Congo”, Lindsay’s best-known poem, became controversial both for its groundbreaking use of sound and for the issues of racism it raises. Novel use of sound Whirl ye the deadly voo-doo rattle, Harry the uplands, Steal all the cattle, Rattle-rattle, rattle-rattle, Bing. Boomlay, boomlay, boomlay, Boom… “The Congo” expressed a revolutionary aesthetic of sound for sound’s sake. It imitates the pounding of…

    • 459 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Imperialism In Congo

    • 1127 Words
    • 5 Pages

    language death, I don’t feel as though it’ll impact this country. Democratic Republic of the Congo Demographics In 2014 the population of the Democratic Republic of the Congo was approximately 75 million. There are about 214 languages spoken there. The official language is French with the national languages being Kikongo, Kiswahili, Lingala and Tshiluba. Colonialism in DRC The Democratic Republic of the Congo was a fiefdom under…

    • 1127 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Decolonization - Congo

    • 1376 Words
    • 6 Pages

    political discussion at issues of society in Belgian Congo. The whole turning point of their advocacy for independence was during January 4-6 in 1959. In January 4, a riot broke out in Leopoldville due to the fact that an Abako meeting had been banned. This abrupt disorder for two days as European shops were broken and burned with over 40 people killed. The administration had political concession meaning that Belgium handed over independence to Congo. On January 13, the administration released a statement…

    • 1376 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays