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Complex Carbohydrates

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Complex Carbohydrates
Name: _____________________________
Chapter 4 – The Carbohydrates: Sugar, Starch, and Fiber

The Simple Carbohydrates: Sugars
Identify food sources for each of the monosaccharides:
• Glucose:
• Fructose:
• Galactose:
Identify food sources for each of the disaccharides listed:
• Sucrose:
• Lactose:
Describe the condition called lactose intolerance.
What causes lactose intolerance?

Lactose intolerance:

Cause:
Are there any treatments for lactose intolerance?

What foods may be better tolerated?

The Complex Carbohydrates: Starch
Starches
Complex carbohydrates include ________________ and ________________.
Polysaccharides
Starch is a polysaccharide made up of many ________________ units bonded together.
Identify the difference between a refined grain and a whole grain:

Which nutrients are added to enriched grains?

A wheat kernel has four parts. After milling, identify the parts that remain for a whole grain and an enriched (refined) grain:
Whole Grain
1.
2.
3.
Enriched Grain
1.
The Complex Carbohydrates: Fiber
Identify two types of fiber:
1.
2.
Identify three potential health benefits from consuming adequate fiber:
1.
2.
3.
A diet based on whole foods may be healthier than a diet based on lots of refined and processed foods. Why?

Recommendations for Carbohydrate Intake
Dietary Guidelines:
• Carbohydrate should range from ______ percent to ______ percent of total calories.
• Added sugars should be ____________ of total calories.
• Fiber intake should be ______ grams per _______ calories consumed.
DRI Committee:
• Carbohydrate should range from ______ percent to ______ percent of total calories.
• Added sugars should have a maximum upper limit of __________ percent or less of total calories.
• Fiber intake should be based on the Adequate Intake (AI) (inside front cover of textbook). Adult men under 50 years of age should consume _____ grams of fiber per day. Adult women under 50 years of

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