Comparison of Pathophysiology for Depression and Schizophrenia with its therapeutic effect

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Abstract
This review focuses on the possible factors that play a role on the development of psychological disorders such as genetic, biological and environmental influences whereby genetic influence involve the imbalance of neurotransmitters that prevent individual’s brain from functioning efficiently as compared to healthy individuals whereas biological influences such as cognitive deficits that impaired partial brain functions of individuals while environmental influence does not directly relates to functional system of brain that involve facing changes in life such as loss of individuals’ health or close relatives which was unexpected would usually trigger the development of psychological disorder such as depression yet depression is likely to be developed differently by different people. Hence, suitable treatment for each individual will usually depend on the outcome of the evaluation that depends on the severity of condition to maintain a pro-longed stability of individual’s condition.

Comparison of Pathophysiology for Depression and Schizophrenia with its therapeutic effect

In recent years, psychological disorders have become more frequently discussed as compared to the past. Certain symptoms of psychological disorders can be diagnosed and treated with medication specifically which includes symptoms that are contentious which would correlate with biological factors such as chemical imbalances and damages of central nervous system.
Past research (Barahani, 2008; Riecher & Haefner, 2010) emphasises that the role of biological aspects are important in the aetiology of psychological disorders as genetic identification is one of the examinable pathways towards understanding of the diseases’ pathobiology and to identify the most effective target treatments for the clients (Karayiorgou, 2010). Research done by Foster and Macqueen (2008) suggested that neurobiological basis of personality could also be one of the possible factor



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