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Comparison Between Phonemic Awareness And Phonics

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Comparison Between Phonemic Awareness And Phonics
In the chapter it goes in depth with phonemic awareness and phonics. Both of them makes phonological instruction which needs to be taught explicit. Phonemic Awareness is spoken words that are made up of individual sounds; each sound is called phonemes. Phonics is the comparing the sounds to the letters. Once both are taught children need to reflect on words dealing with phonological knowledge.
From research phonemic awareness has barely receive attention on how it should be taught but phonics has been around for years. Some elementary teachers only focus on phonics, but worry they are teaching it as a chore. Teaching must be different to meet all students need and what find what works for each student. When it is taught, it can help students

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