Comparing The Stereotypes Of Appalachia And Globalization

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2. In your discussion this unit, talk about the stereotypes of Appalachia and how these have changed or are changing with the “globalization” of American culture.

The people of the Appalachian region are often trivialized through numerous stereotypes. The media has often portrayed individuals are ignorant, racists, who are resistant to outside influence, and live without running water, and electricity. The people of Appalachia are of Scot-Irish descent, these immigrants faced prejudice dating back to the 1700’s, which forced them to migrate farther inland. The mountain region reminded the immigrants of their country of origins and many of their ancestors have remained there.

Globalization has brought the world to this once isolated area.

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