Comparing Freud's Views On Religion, And Art

Better Essays
Freud’s Civilization and it’s Discontents spoke about his views on religion, science, and art. He believes that religion is restrictive, which could lead to more conflicts. He also believes that religion is an illusion. He believed that the origin of religion could be traced back as far as feeling of infantile helplessness. There needs to be a paternal protector for infantile helplessness or else we would not know what to do as children. In religion, we could view the paternal protector as God. Freud views science as facts, technology, and advancements, which could cause problems. Science removes us from the external world. Freud views art as an illusion of reality, which could bring pleasure. Art provides a difference between reality and illusion. He believed that if you have art and science, you do not need religion. Religion, art and science are also known as achievements of civilization, which fit into his theory of human happiness. Freud defines happiness in terms of the satisfaction of need or desire. Happiness is hard to achieve, which is where Freud’s pleasure principle is found. There are two parts of the pleasure principle, which are negative aim, that avoids pain and suffering and positive aim is getting pleasure. As a civilization, the more advancements we …show more content…
We exploit the earth for resources, energy and building. It is the way we are able to build and advance our society. Beauty is for pleasure, enjoyment and not for necessary. Cleanliness prevents disease and order is psychological. Law also takes place in civilization because it regulates human relationships. Freud’s view on state of nature is that society did not start until civilization started when we have a variety of wants and needs. However, Rousseau has a different view on state of nature, which is that we started out with basic wants and needs that included sex, food and

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Freud's View of Religion

    • 933 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Explain Freud’s view of religion Sigmund Freud grew up in a Catholic town in Moravia, where he was one of a very small number of Jew’s. He claimed to have grown up without any belief in God, and never to have felt the need for it. Freud worked from the presupposition that the origin of religion is psychological, he assumed from the start that religious belief; religious experience and religious impulses come from within the mind and not from any external supernatural being. In Freud’s view, people…

    • 933 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Freud’s understanding of religion He believed that religion is an illusion, and this is based on wish fulfilment. In certain circumstances the human mind creates images and beliefs to satisfy their basic desires. Therefore Freud believes the human mind created religion, and so this is an illusion. Also, religion helps people overcome our inner psychological conflict (collective neurosis); conflicts between civilisation and helplessness and fear of natural forces. Freud states that religion…

    • 514 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Freud's View of Civilization

    • 2423 Words
    • 10 Pages

    Freud's view of civilization emerges from his understanding of the struggle between Eros and Death. Freud expresses the existence of two contrary instincts, Eros and Death, via starting from the speculations on the beginning of life and biological parallels. While Eros preserves the living substance and joins it into larger units, such as societies, Death dissolves these units and brings them back to their primeval state. The death drives appear to be regressive, striving for a return to a less differentiated…

    • 2423 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Civilization and Its Discontents, by Sigmund Freud, Freud offers his personal views on humanity’s ideas of religion and morality. The Book of J, translated from the Hebrew by David Rosenberg, features characters who do not necessarily seem to be comparable to Freud’s thinking, as they exhibit behaviors unique to their time or story. Though Civilizations and Its Discontents and The Book of J are two contrasting texts in time, Freud’s thinking helps a reader to understand The Book of J to a greater extent…

    • 753 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Freud’s Psychodynamic Theory explained the regions of the mind, known as the conscious, preconscious, and unconscious. Freud believed that within these three areas of consciousness, was an internal conflict. However, Abraham Maslow argued differently, and developed the Humanistic Theory as a response to Freud’s Psychodynamic Theory and other behavioral theories. Whereas Freud’s theory argued that mental processes controlees our lives, Maslow argued that we are free beings that control our consciousness…

    • 1012 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Comparing Religions

    • 870 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Comparing Religions For centuries, humans have had questions about their existence: “What is my purpose?”, “Why am I here?”, or “Where did I come from?”. Religions have helped answer these questions. Some questions, such as “Where did I come from?”, have been answered in great detail. Creation stories give people a sense of where everything they see and interact with all originated from. Some stories have many similarities, others have seldom. Two religions that come from completely separate…

    • 870 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Judy Blume once said, “Some changes happen deep down inside you and the truth is, only you know about them.” Freud’s concepts in his 1917 work Mourning and Melancholia offer possibilities of thinking about change and loss in different ways and at different levels. In this paper I shall explore the idea that mourning rather than melancholia must occur throughout all developmental stages of life in order to reach a healthy and peaceful time in your life where the concept of loss can be fully accepted…

    • 633 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    (34). Unlike the previous quotes from Foucault and Freud which present the triumph of the group over the individual, O’Brien allows for a glimpse into the mindset of those in power. Overarchingly, it demonstrates how individuals in positions of power view such power, and provides understanding as to why those individuals desperately try to keep power and the knowledge of how to wield such power away from those they…

    • 460 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Part A) Examine Freud’s View of Religious Belief. Sigmund Freud was born in 1856; he lived most of his life in Vienna. His family were Jewish so was brought in a religious faith. Freud fled the Nazi’s in London then died the following year on the 23rd of September 1939. He was an atheist. He saw himself as “The Godless Jew”. He rejected both America and Religion. Freud had a Neurotic and obsessional character. Freud’s view on religious belief was a form of neurotic illness. Freud believed that…

    • 299 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Freuds view on religion

    • 441 Words
    • 2 Pages

    What is Freud's view on religion? Sigmund Freud was an Austrian psychologist, born May 1953 and died September 1939 aged 83. He had a very Jewish upbringing, yet considered himself to be an atheist, and his later works showed that he considered religion to be a type of neurosis. At various points in his work, Freud suggests that religion is an attempt to subdue or control what is known as the Oedipus complex; a father-son mental sexual competition over the mother. This suggests that the son feels…

    • 441 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays