Compare and contrast

Topics: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood, Arthur C. Clarke Award Pages: 3 (817 words) Published: December 4, 2013

Tolerate the indifference
A widespread issue throughout the civilization of our century is that no one observes the traits of the individual being subjected to discrimination, as an alternative their label is based off unchangeable characteristics. The two accounts being discussed on the theme of discernment are The Handmaid’s Tale and Black Boy. In both books, characters scuffle in their identifiable methods against a culture that dominated them. They both ultimately battle and seek risky and dangerous road to escape. In The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood, a women by the name of Offred is labeled by the viable ovaries as a handmaid. Handmaids are the fertile women whose sole purpose is to bear children. The handmaids have horrible lives as prisoners. Living like a handmaid would have been brutal and extremely challenging. The culture basically belittles women and practically enslaves them. Offred and the other Handmaids are valued only if their ovaries are viable. In the autobiography Black Boy by Richard Wright, Richard discusses his challenges throughout childhood. He faced a massive deal of racism and pure ignorance. Richard finds his salvation in reading, writing, and thinking. He grows up feeling insecure about his inability to meet the expectation of his culture. “The color of a Negro's skin makes him easily recognizable, makes him suspect, converts him into a defenseless target.” (Wright) While comparing the two books, one should find that Offred and Richard share multiple similarities. The correspondence between sexism and racism consist of leading a person feeling uncomfortable and inferior. Both characters had less opportunities in life and personal confidence issues. Offred experienced a life before Gilead and was aware of the liberation she lost along with her family. Atwood displays Offred’s mindset towards Gilead by mentioning “My name isn't Offred, I have another name, which nobody uses now because it's forbidden. I tell myself it...

Cited: Wright, Richard. Black Boy. Sixtieth Anniversary Edition. New York: Harper Perennial, 1993. 1-257. Print.
Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid 's Tale. New York: Anchor Books, 1998. Print.
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