comparative essay

Topics: Charlotte's Web, Runt, Nazism Pages: 5 (1205 words) Published: November 23, 2014


I have sent emails to you to talk about my devised topic. My topic is to talk about memorable characters: round and dynamic, flat or static. These characters play different roles for different purpose. I will choose one character form each of Charlotte's Web and Hana's Suitcase that I find are important to their stories. I will examine their development, their purposes in the text and their overall impact on the themes.

The round and dynamic characters in Charlotte’s Web and Hana’s Suitcase The protagonist of Charlotte’s Web is the pig Wilbur, though the title is named after Charlotte. As a round character, Wilbur is described in detail and fully developed from his appearance to characteristics. First of all, the appearance of Wilbur is depicted in different stages: when he was born, “It was a white one. The morning light shone through its ears, turning them pink”(White 6), and when he got famous, “Note the smoothness and whiteness of the coat, observe the spotless skin, the healthy pink glow of ears and snout”(White 135). What’s more, the diet, nature and hobbies of Wilbur are introduced in the text. For example, his breakfast usually includes skim milk, crusts, potato skins and shredded wheat etc.; his lunch could be middlings, warm water, apple parings, meat scraps, carrot scrapings and stale hominy etc.; the supper for him may have skim milk, provender, prune skins and so on (White 22-23). Being faithful to the facts that Wilbur, after all, is a pig, it was difficult for him to reject the lure of a pail of warm slops (White 19-20); and his hobbies are definitely sleep, digging and rooting the ground with his snout and rubbing the fence for scratching itch. By looking through the full story, Wilbur has undergone an internal change, which indicates he is also a dynamic character who matures from helplessness when he learns that he is to be slaughtered, to being able to take action by ensuring the safety of Charlotte's children. For instance, when Wilbur knows he will be killed in winter, his reaction is “ ‘I can't be quiet,’ screamed Wilbur, racing up and down. ‘I don't want to be killed. I don't want to die’” and “throwing himself to the ground” (White 43-44). This childish behavior demonstrates that Wilbur formerly is innocent and immature, he has no solution but crying when he comes across difficulties. However, after going through the Country Fair event and the inspiration from Charlotte, Wilbur’s intelligence is developed as a result that he knows ask Templeton for help to save Charlotte’s children. Meanwhile, there is a transformation inside Wilbur in terms of his thoughts about Charlotte. When he first met her, he thought she is brutal and bloodthirsty, nevertheless, he soon realized that Charlotte is a kind-hearted and loyal friend and her behavior of preying on pests is good for humans and also makes a better environment for them to live (White 35). Friendship and love are the main theme of this novel and Wilbur is the central character, so his personality, action and development have a strong connection the theme. Without Fern’s love for Wilbur he would have been killed as a runt and without Charlotte’s love he would be served up on the Christmas dinner table. On the one hand, the innocent, goodness and the spirit of not giving up easily of Wilbur are the premise for Charlotte and other livestock to make friends with him and help him; and right because of this, a solid friendship between Charlotte and Wilbur is built. On the other hand, Wilbur pays Charlotte back by taking care of her children after she perishes reflects the theme that gratefulness should be always remembered during one’s life. However, the round and dynamic character is not always the protagonist. In Hana’s Suitcase, George, the protagonist-Hana’s big brother, is a round as well as dynamic character even though he seems have...

Cited: Levine, Karen. Hana’s Suitcase. Toronto: Second Story Press, 2002. Print.
White, E.B. "Charlotte`s Web" (n.d.): 1-157. 27 Mar. 2007. Web. 10 Oct. 2014. .
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