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Communication Arts I

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A d a m s S ta te U n i v e rsi t y

E x t e n d e d St u d i e s
Independent Study Course

www.exstudies.adams.edu

ENG 101 – SECITON #686
COMMUNICATION ARTS I

STUDY GUIDE

Prepared by:
Ellen Simpson Novotny, M.A.
Adams State University
208 Edgemont Blvd., Suite 3000
Alamosa, CO 81101
Fax: 719.587.7974 (must include instructor’s name) enovotny@adams.edu ©2012 Adams State University

ENG 101 – COMMUNICATION ARTS I
WELCOME FROM YOUR INSTRUCTOR ~
Welcome to English 101!
My name is Ellen Simpson Novotny. I have been teaching English and Composition since 1990.
When I completed my undergraduate degree and plunged into graduate classes, composition was the least of my academic interests. However, after years of teaching writing, I’ve come to enjoy the challenge of working with students of all variety of backgrounds, helping each individual grow in his or her writing skills. Improved writing skills are tangible, so both the student and teacher enjoy the rewards immediately, especially since quality writing skills link with success in almost any profession.
I grew up in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. After studying at St. Norbert College in DePere, WI, (B.A.) and South Dakota State University in Brookings, SD, (M.A.) I landed in Alamosa, CO. I taught high school English for 10 years. Currently, I work from home, exclusively for the ASU
Extended Studies Office, allowing me flexibility to raise the children and manage the home. The best part about independent study is I am privileged to have taught writing students as young as
3rd grade and as ripened as 3rd generation.
I have a husband, two children, one mother/grandmother, and one dog in my family here. As a family, we like to hike, camp, fish, read, snowboard, bike, swim, garden, and travel. When I grow up, I would like to take striking pictures of the people and places I love.
The English 101 course syllabus explains the requirements for each writing assignment, in detail.
The textbook readings will further explain the links between various techniques, skills, and strategies. I suggest first skimming the reading material, so you are better able to discern overall content and how it links to your existing knowledge base. If necessary, a more studied reading and annotating session can offer in-depth explanation of the new writing concept. Enrollment in
English 101 assumes basic writing skills, so I have not assigned any grammar study. However, the handbook A Writer’s Reference will assist you with many composition questions, so I recommend keeping it handy!
Please feel free to contact me. Ask a question. Make a statement. Say something interesting.
Tell me why you liked or disliked a particular type of writing. You can reach me either through e-mail, fax, or postal mail.
E-mail:

Fax:

enovotny@adams.edu
Save work as a Word document and attach to an e-mail message.
719-587-7974
This fax serves all of Extended Studies, so include my name.

Extended Studies:
1-800-548-6679
719-587-7671 ascextend@adams.edu Adams State University—Extended Studies©

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ENG 101 – COMMUNICATION ARTS I
Mail:

E.S. Novotny
ASU Extended Studies
208 Edgemont Blvd., Suite 3000
Alamosa, CO, 81101

Cell Phone:

719-588-3290
If you must.
You may leave a message at any time. Please include your number and appropriate calling times. Most of the time, I will not pick up a new number. After listening to voice mail, I will likely e-mail you. Please consider before calling that your lack of advance planning does not constitute an emergency on this side of the desk.

Your first “assignment” is to tell me a little bit about yourself. Write one or two paragraphs.
Include how you got your name, one thing you would like to do someday (answering why is not necessary), the last time you had to write four sentences in a row – for any reason – why you are taking this course, one fear or concern you have about this course, what time frame we need to work with, and any other pertinent information.
I look forward to working with you!
Ellen Simpson Novotny

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ENG 101 – COMMUNICATION ARTS I
SYLLABUS
Instructor:
E-mail:
Phone:
Fax:
Address:

Ellen Simpson Novotny, M.A. enovotny @adams.edu please contact instructor via e-mail or fax
719.587.7974 (must include instructor’s name!)
Adams State University
Extended Studies
208 Edgemont Blvd., Suite 3000
Alamosa, CO 81101

COURSE DELIVERY:
Print-Based Correspondence Course
CREDIT HOURS:
Three Semester Hours
COURSE MATERIALS:
To order textbooks or obtain information about book titles, you may go to www.exstudies.adams.edu and click on the “ASU Bookstore” icon.
Use Section Number: 686 to order books from the Bookstore site.
Required Textbooks:
Hacker, Diana and Nancy Sommers. A Writer's Reference. 7th ed. Boston:
Bedford/St. Martin's, 2011. Print. See the companion website also
. ISBN-10: 0-312-60143-3/ISBN-13:
978-0-312-60143-0.
Rosa, Alfred and Paul Eschholz. Models for Writers: Short Essays for
Composition. 10th ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2010. Print. See
ISBN-10: 0-312-53113-3/ISBN-13: 978-0-312-53113-3.
Recommended Materials:
Collegiate, up-to-date dictionary and Thesaurus and / or the skills to know where to find and how to use electronic sources
CATALOG DESCRIPTION:
A course designed to provide students with the reading, writing and critical thinking skills necessary to produce effective college-level expository writing.

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ENG 101 – COMMUNICATION ARTS I
CURRICULAR RELATIONSHIPS:
Effective writing is fundamental to student learning and success in every discipline.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Major outcomes: Students will
A. improve their ability to read and write effectively, accurately, and critically,
B. and think independently, analytically, and creatively.
.
2. Minor outcomes: Students will
A. cultivate appreciation for diverse cultures, persons and ideas and increase their understanding of their place in a multicultural framework;
B. practice distinguishing fact from opinion;
C. function effectively in groups;
D. respond to the aesthetic dimensions of human experience in the field of writing, explore basic moral and ethical philosophies, and consider the place of writing in community involvement; and
E. develop writing-related technology skills.
Content Outline
1) How to write effective expository essays
a) finding a topic and developing a thesis
b) organization and development
c) unity and coherence
d) introductions, transitions, and conclusions
e) grammar and mechanics, the rules of Standard English
f) style and voice
g) analyzing and addressing different audiences
h) the rhetorical patterns
2) The writing process, its steps, its importance
3) Writing in different contexts for different purposes (academic, persuasive, business, creative, personal)
4) Writings of multicultural professional writers
a) reading critically
b) analyzing and responding to the ideas
c) analyzing the structure and presentation
5) Using word processors, spell checkers, and grammar checkers
In addition to coverage of these topics, the largest component of the class will consist of students practicing these skills by writing and revising their own essays.

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COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
The student will draft, revise, edit, and finalize one short writing assignment, one thesis assignment, three full-length essays, and a final exam. The shorter writing will be about one page. The longer essays should be three to four pages each on a topic of the student’s selection within the assigned method of development.
Students must complete all assignments and the final exam to pass the course. The first assignments will receive extensive instructor comments. The later assignments will involve continued instructor guidance, but to a lesser degree as the expectations increase for the student to demonstrate improved skills. Since a great deal of learning happens when we revise our writing, the student is expected to revise at least two of the works and receive an improved grade on the revised compositions. (A Writer’s Reference defines revision in section C3).
Furthermore, students may rewrite any particularly weak essay or assignment throughout the course to improve overall learning and class grade, with instructor approval.
The Final Exam will be a proctored essay to include the full writing process within the three hours allowed. The student will have a choice of comparison / contrast topics and be allowed to use a dictionary, thesaurus, notes, and textbooks.
GRADE DISTRIBUTION AND SCALE:
In alignment with ASU academic policies, no D may apply to a major or minor field.
Grade Distribution:
1 shorter writing
1 full-length, formal essay
1 thesis assignment
2 full-length, formal essays
2 extensive revisions
Final proctored essay exam
Total Points

100 points
100 points
100 points
200 points each
50 points each
200 points

100 points
100 points
100 points
400 points
100 points
200 points
1000 points

Scale:
90-100%
80-89%
70-79%
60-69%
59% and below

A
B
C
D
F

ADA STATEMENT:
Students who need special accommodation to complete this class should contact the instructor and the Diversity Officer in the Office of Equal Opportunity at 719.587.8213 as soon as possible.

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ENG 101 – COMMUNICATION ARTS I
COURSE INSTRUCTIONS AND COURSEWORK SCHEDULE
THE STUDY GUIDE
REQUIRED TEXTS and COMPANION WEBSITES:
Hacker, Diana and Nancy Sommers. A Writer's Reference. 7th ed. Boston:
Bedford/St. Martin's, 2011. Print. See the companion website also
. ISBN-10: 0-312-60143-3/ISBN-13:
978-0-312-60143-0.
Rosa, Alfred and Paul Eschholz. Models for Writers: Short Essays for
Composition. 10th ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2010. Print. See
ISBN-10: 0-312-53113-3/ISBN-13: 978-0-312-53113-3.
Note: the textbooks and the companion websites are very much the teacher in the independent study course. Choosing to not read the selections is like choosing to skip class.
Note about Using Models for Writers: Read only what you feel unfamiliar with. Skim content that is review for you. After reading an essay, consider the “Questions for Study and
Discussion” and “Classroom Activity Using . . .” to further review and practice the writing techniques being taught. Along the same lines, preceding each reading is a section called
“Reflecting on What You Know” from which you can gain many IDEAS for writing TOPICS.
After reading each selection, think about what techniques and skills the writer used that you can use in your own writing.
Feel free to read any of the essays throughout the entire textbook. Responding directly to the textbook essays has always led my students to successful writing topics.

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ENG 101 – COMMUNICATION ARTS I
INTRODUCTION AND REVIEW:
About Me: Send a brief letter of introduction to the instructor.

WRITING IS A THINKING AND LEARNING PROCESS
Models for Writers (MFW): p. 1-4 “Introduction”
MFW “provides information, instruction, and practice in writing essays. By reading thoughtfully and by applying the writing strategies and techniques you observe other writers using, you will learn to write more expressively and efficiently” (4).
Notice these sections in the book: “On Reading and Writing Well,” “Elements of the
Essay,” “Language of the Essay,” and “Types of Essays.”
A Writer’s Reference C: “Composing and Revising,” reviews the writing process, especially planning (prewriting) strategies.

MANUSCRIPT FORMAT
MLA is the acronym for the Modern Language Association. This organization sets the rules for the style we use in the humanities. Each academic discipline has their own set of rules for format, documentation, and research. Be aware of what your instructor wants for each course and follow the appropriate format. This course uses MLA format.
See WR MLA-5: “Manuscript Format” and “Sample Paper”. Also remember that the course requirements demand demonstration of skills using Standard English and MLA format.
Be aware that MLA updated in 2009. Be certain you are using the most current style format. RHETORICAL PATTERNS
Study the different Rhetorical Patterns or Organizational Patterns that writers use.
MFW p. 15-18.
WR C4.c “Using Patterns of Organization”
DESCRIPTION

MFW Chapter 15

RECOMMENDED READING:
MFW “Description” Chapter 14, page 387.
MFW p. 389 “Subway Station” Notice transitions.

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MFW p. 393 “Memories of New York City” Notice the strong use of imagery. Notice the long list of descriptors in paragraph 2. You can use this technique. Notice the strong dominant impression, declared in the last line, but built throughout the essay that “New
York represented the future” (394).
MFW p. 397 “The Corner Store” Notice Welty’s use of lists, and more lists in each paragraph. Notice the sensory details for each: sight, sound, touch taste / smell.
MFW p. 402 “My Favorite Teacher” Notice Friedman’s use of short, declarative sentences.
Also notice the use of the dash -- as a piece of punctuation. You can use this punctuation.
MFW p. 52 “Fable for Tomorrow”
MFW p. 119 “A View From the Bridge” Notice details and organization.
MFW p. 94 “Unity” Chapter 4
MFW p. 114 “Organization” Chapter 5
WR W3.a and W3.b “Active Verbs”
MFW p. 28 “Weak Nouns and Verbs”
NOTE: I think strong verbs are the KEY to effective writing. After an initial draft, my classroom students revise for stronger verbs. Using vivid verbs is like putting your essay on a super-vitamin. I urge you to attempt some of the verb activities!
WR W5.b “Concrete Nouns”
MFW p. 258 “Be Specific”
WR W5.f “Figures of Speech”
IMPORTANT CONCEPTS:
Take note of descriptive writing in the world around you: sports writing, realty (house and property) listings, descriptions of food in cookbooks or on menus, and descriptions of merchandise in some clothing catalogues.
Good description calls for many details invoking many senses. In the revision process, the writer selects only those details which effectively create a single dominant impression. Descriptive details engage the reader on the visceral level, bringing the reader to a ‘gut’
(non-intellectual) level of understanding as he / she draws upon related personal experiences. Adams State University—Extended Studies©

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ACTIVITIES TO PRACTICE WRITING SKILLS:
MFW p. 400 “Activity Using Description” -- about vivid verb choices
MFW p. 397 “Reflecting on What You Know” create a sensory chart (sight, sound, touch, taste/smell and then consider the “6th sense”. How do these details make you FEEL? This is the dominant impression).
MFW p. 401 “Suggested Writing Assignments “ #1 brainstorming -- make a long list. #2 create a sensory chart (sight, sound, touch, taste/smell) and then consider the “6th sense” how do these details make you FEEL – this is the dominant impression).
MFW p. 338 “Activity Using . . . ” demonstrates using specific versus abstract nouns
MFW p. 302 “Activity Using Tone and Diction” changes word choice to suit audience
MFW p. 237 “Activity Using Effect. Sent.” using coordination /subordination
Example of a Sensory Chart: sight sound

Touch

taste/smell

How does this make you feel?

Etc.

Etc.

Etc.

Etc.

Etc.

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ENG 101 – COMMUNICATION ARTS I
ASSIGNMENT #1: Write a DESCRIPTION PARAGRAPH
Write 2-3 paragraphs using description to develop a topic of your choice. You may use one of the “Activities to Practice” you began above. Remember that effective description uses vivid details which appeal to the reader’s senses (sight, sound, touch, taste/smell), selected and arranged in such a way to create a single, dominant impression. Use the pronoun “I” (not “you”) in your writing. When revising, work for varied sentence structure and strong verb choices. As a final revision, add in a figure of speech to further characterize your topic. Title your work.
Topic Ideas for Description: (one small object works effectively for this assignment)
Describe any person, place, or thing:
A favorite item of clothing, A favorite meal, A favorite cookie
A hated piece of clothing (something from your childhood can work well)
A small place -- deli, coffee shop, boutique, locker room, one room in your home,
A gadget you could not live without
The inside of something (glove compartment, a drawer)
Your last camping site
Personal Prewriting:
I will describe: ________________________________________________________
My dominant impression is: _______________________________________________
When you have completed Assignment #1, Description, please complete the Writer’s
Checklist for personal use. Revise the assignment after reflecting on the checklist. Submit the work to the instructor via e-mail, fax, or land mail. Remember, the instructor will make comments and possibly ask for you to revise the assignment.

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ENG 101 – COMMUNICATION ARTS I
PROCESS ANALYSIS

MFW Chapter 16

RECOMMENDED READING:
MFW “Process Analysis” Chapter 16 Pages 407 – 410
MFW p. 417 “Young Love” Notice Sharples’ use of narrative style and concrete examples as she describes HOW humans learn to love.
MFW p. 152 "How I Got Smart" Notice Brody’s use of narration and description, transitions, dialogue, humor; thus - notice his choice of examples.
MFW p. 278 “Shame” Notice Gregory’s use of repetition in the final paragraph. Consider this as a process analysis, for example: “how I learned about shame”.
MFW p. 228 “Salvation” Notice Hughes’ use of effective sentence techniques. Consider this as a process analysis, for example: “how I learned about salvation”.
MFW p. 192 “Transitions” Chapter 8
Transitions improve the coherence of your writing by showing the relationship between one idea and the next.
MFW p. 196 “On Being 17, Bright, and Unable to Read” Read Brody’s essay as “how it happens”. WR C4.d “Improving Coherence”
WR C2.a “Drafting: Introduction and Thesis”
WR C2.c “Drafting: Conclusion”
MFW p.137 “Beginnings and Endings" Chapter 6
WR C4 “Writing Paragraphs” Good explanation.
MFW p. 169 “Paragraphs” Chapter 7
MFW p. 173 "Simplicity" Zinser writes about uncluttering our lives and our writing. He proposes that if the reader is lost, then the writer has not been careful enough. Writing is hard work! Keep it simple – say exactly what you mean.
MFW p. 273 “Diction & Tone” Chapter 11.
WR W1 – W6 “Word Choice”
Note: Building tone in writing is like building tone in muscles (requires repitition).
MFW p. 217 “Effective Sentences” Chapter 9

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WR S1 – S7 “Sentence Style”
S1 – Parallelism S6.a -- Coordination and Subordination

S7 -- Sentence Variety

WR C1 "Planning" (Outlining)
WR S6.b “Combine Choppy Sentences”
IMPORTANT CONCEPTS:
*Do I have to remember all of this information during every part of the writing process?
NO. Do I eventually (through a series of revisions) have to incorporate all these important elements, at a quality level, into my writing? YES.
*A first draft is a first draft, unless you are planning a writing career. I treat each writing technique or concept as a revision. If I have 30 minutes of time available right now, I’ll decide to revise for stronger verbs or look at my transitions. The next 30 minutes available I’ll look at my beginnings and endings. A checklist helps.
*Careful word choice and sentence construction help create a writing style and voice that is uniquely your own. The more “real” you become to the reader, the more effective your overall communication, which is the ultimate goal of all writing.
ACTIVITIES TO PRACTICE WRITING SKILLS
MFW p. 200 “Activity Using Transitions”
MFW p. 206 “Activity Using Transitions”
MFW p. 150 “Activity Using Beginnings and Endings”
MFW p. 156 “Activity Using Beginnings and Endings”
MFW p. 112-3 “Activity Using Unity” a sample process analysis / notice transitions

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ENG 101 – COMMUNICATION ARTS I
ASSIGNMENT #2: PROCESS ANALYSIS ESSAY
Write 2-3 pages analyzing a process of your choice. Your approach may be either informational or directional. After dividing the process into clear steps, be certain to use transitions to keep the reader with you as you move through the process. Within each step, include plenty of descriptive details so the reader has a thorough understanding. Remember that you are either explaining or informing, and an occasional explanation of “why” is helpful. An interesting presentation is achieved with strong verbs and intriguing introductions and conclusions. To further develop your process analysis, work for sentence variety. Use the present tense (the action occurs as I read it) and the pronoun “I” (not “you”) in your writing. As a final revision, tell me WHY understanding this process is important. Title your essay in a more interesting way than the following topic ideas (try: 10 Ways to Keep Your Keys!).
Process Analysis Directional Topic Ideas: Process Analysis Informational Topic Ideas:
How to bake bread
How consumers make up their minds
How to kick a habit (losing keys)
How a political candidate runs for office
How to win at poker
How an appliance works
How to write a letter of complaint
How a bad habit develops
How to groom a horse
How spenders fall into debt
How to buy a used piano / car
How the Social Security System works
How to make an effective complaint
How managing a/an _________ works
How to improve the place you work
How a ______________ does his / her job
How to build (or fly) a kite
How a dead thing decays (or any natural process)
*** One tip my students have found useful over time is to use a model, and name him or her, to demonstrate the steps in the process. This solves the “you” problem and makes the process very real for the reader. For example, “In building a kite, Jane must first gather all the supplies.”
Personal Prewriting:
My process analysis will be about: __________________________________________ The point or benefit of understanding this process is: ___________________________
____________________________________________________________________
When you have completed Assignment #2, Process Analysis, please complete the Writer’s
Checklist for personal use. Revise the assignment after considering the checklist. Submit the work to the instructor via e-mail, fax, or land mail. The instructor will then make comments for you to improve the writing.

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ENG 101 – COMMUNICATION ARTS I
THESIS STATEMENT
MFW p. 73 - 75 "Thesis "
WR C1.c “Formulate a Tentative Thesis”
WR C2.a “For Most Types of Writing, Draft an Introduction That Includes a Thesis”
WR MLA-1 "Form a Tentative Thesis"
Remember:

Outlining and Transitions

ACTIVITIES TO PRACTICE THESIS WRITING SKILLS:
MFW p. 79 "Classroom Activity Using Thesis"
MFW p. 87 for 6 sample thesis statements. Remove the sample topic “x” and insert your own topic. Get it!? Then make your thesis more specific by naming specific reasons or criteria you will discuss.
THE COMPANION WEBSITE HAS AN INTERACTIVE THESIS EXERCISE.
THESIS STATEMENTS NOTES
Develop a working thesis statement in two parts: topic part comment part
Begin with "What I want to say is that . . . " (remove or erase this part later)
Develop a working thesis by determining a question you are trying to answer
A thesis statement has 3 characteristics: limits topic interesting for potential readers employs specific, concrete language
Formal requirements for writing a thesis:
One or two declarative sentences
Assert or deny something about the subject
Do not confuse a thesis statement with a purpose statement
A thesis statement is not a question

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STRONG THESIS STATEMENTS
1. Due to the money spent and the human lives lost in the manned space program, its continuance cannot be justified.
2. Television programs depicting violence numb children's sensitivity to real-life acts of violence. 3. Because the polygraph has not been proven reliable, its use by private employers should be banned. 4. Although various methods for limiting or disposing of nuclear wastes have been proposed, each has serious drawbacks.
5. Banning certain web sites limits students' free access to ideas and information. (Or banning certain books from the library)
6. Despite the safety record of the airline industry, aging planes pose a major threat to potential passengers. 7. The American education system does a disservice to students because of the minimal importance placed on foreign language instruction.
8. Advertising in the guise of news or personal commentary represents a disturbing trend in the print media and in television.
** A good imitation is the most perfect originality. Voltaire ***

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ASSIGNMENT 3: THESIS STATEMENT PRACTICE
Read the directions and complete the assignment in MFW p. 86 "Classroom Activity Using
Thesis".
When you have completed Assignment #3, Thesis Statement Practice, send it directly to the instructor via e-mail, fax, or land mail.

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ENG 101 – COMMUNICATION ARTS I
ARGUMENTATION & PERSUASION

MFW Chapter 21

ILLUSTRATION

MFW Chapter 13

RECOMMENDED READING:
MFW "Argument" Chapter 21 Page 525
MFW "Illustration" Chapter 13 Page 325. Show through examples -– do not only tell.
MFW “Writing With Sources” Chapter 10 page 245
WR A1 “Writing about Texts”
WR A2 “Constructing Reasonable Arguments”
WR A3 "Evaluating Arguments"
Select any of the essays in the Argument and or Illustration sections (4 or so which interest you). Alternately, see the “Thematic Clusters” list in the front of the
MFW textbook, pages xx-xxiv.
In the essays you read: notice thesis and the type of supporting evidence used.
Any argumentative essay requires an engaged, active reader!!!
IMPORTANT CONCEPTS:
*The term ‘argument’ refers to a discussion of varying opinions, not a shouting match.
An argument can have several different purposes: to inform, to convince, to explore, to make decisions, to contemplate or reflect.
*Argumentation and persuasion techniques are often combined because people are both rational and emotional – so we can convince most effectively by appealing to both parts of human nature.
*Argumentation can be combined with every other method of development.
Writing an Argument:
1. Plan a strategy: list your arguments, list opposing viewpoints, consider your audience, then RETHINK your position.
2. Frame a THESIS and sketch an outline.
3. Draft an introduction that states your position but does not alienate readers.
4. Support each argument with specific evidence. (Use facts, data, statistics, examples, anecdotes, illustrations, other essays, expert opinions).
5. Use quotes from the essays in our textbook. Avoid plagiarizing. Use MLA format in-text citations to give credit to borrowed material.
6. Refute objections.
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ENG 101 – COMMUNICATION ARTS I
7. Establish Common Ground.
8. Avoid common mistakes in reasoning (See: logical fallacies).
9. Conclude forcefully.
ACTIVITIES TO PRACTICE WRITING SKILLS:
MFW p. 537-8 "Activity Using Argument"
MFW p. 544 "Activity Using Argument" (about giving compliments)
MFW p. 560 "Activity Using Argument" logical fallacies
MFW p. 186 “I Just Wanna Be Average”

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ENG 101 – COMMUNICATION ARTS I
ASSIGNMENT #4: ARGUMENTATION PERSUASION ESSAY USING
ILLUSTRATION
Write about 4 pages using argumentative / persuasive / illustration writing techniques to discuss and counter-argue any of essays from the textbook. You may discuss one particular essay or you may consider a cluster of essays within the same theme. See “Thematic Clusters” in the front of the MFW textbook, xx-xxiv. In this case, to support your discussion, you will need to use quotes from the essays in our textbook. Avoid plagiarizing. Use the sample paper and the other directions in the MLA section of WR. The appendix “Blending Quotes Smoothly Into Your
Writing” will also help you do this. You will not be downgraded for errors in your efforts
(precise citations are required in English 102). However, making no effort to offer citations will receive a failing grade. I will mark corrections and ask you to revise your citations as necessary.
Be certain to include a clear, logical thesis. Remember that logical argumentation / persuasion uses facts, data, statistics, examples, anecdotes, illustrations, and expert opinions to support your point. Use the present tense (the action occurs as I read it) and the pronouns “I” and “we” (not
“you”) in your writing, to avoid alienating the reader. Consider the implications of your own belief. When revising, work for an engaging opening which will not alienate readers. Consider adding a metaphor or image to your introduction which can carry throughout your essay. As a final revision, to further develop your argumentation / persuasion, refute any major objections the opposing side may offer. Furthermore, conclude forcefully, and offer a belief or action you want the reader to take after your reading argument. Title your work. Underline your thesis.
Argumentation / Persuasion Topic Idea:
Any topic discussed in any of the essays in the textbook.
My argumentation / persuasion will be about: __________________________________
The point or benefit of understanding this aspect of the argument is: _______________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
Sample thesis statements for responding to an essay in our textbook:
When I am ready to die, I want someone like Barbara Huttman to be there to help me, instead of being forced to suffer and torture my family.
(MFW p. 329 “A Crime of Compassion”).
When I consider my own experiences and that of my friends, I see that Tiffany Sharples makes a compelling point in her essay about how humans acquire the skills to build romantic relationships from infancy through adolescence.
(MFW p. 417 “Young Love”).

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ENG 101 – COMMUNICATION ARTS I
I agree with Mary Sherry’s argument that underperforming students should be failed. I know several unskilled students in my high school graduating class received a diploma, although they did not deserve it.
(MFW p. 552 “In Praise of the ‘F’ Word”).
When you have completed Assignment #4, Argumentation Persuasion, please complete the
Writer’s Checklist for personal use. Revise the assignment after reflecting on the checklist.
Submit the work to the instructor via email, fax, or land mail.

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ENG 101 – COMMUNICATION ARTS I
DIVISION & CLASSIFICATION

MFW Chapter 18

RECOMMENDED READING:
MFW "Division and Classification" Chapter 18 pages 448 - 451
MFW p. 132 “The Ways of Meeting Oppression” Notice how King classifies three reactions to oppression and details the benefits and weaknesses of each approach.
MFW p. 458 "Friends" Notice that Viorst numbers her categories. YOU WILL NOT.
Notice that paragraph 3 tells criteria for different categories.
Notice Viorst’s use of general examples and specific, concrete examples.
MFW p. 452 "You Are What You Search" Boutin divides different internet search terms into categories, and then analyzes the connection among the parts and the whole.
MFW p. 515 “Stuck on the Couch” Gupta divides the lack of American exercising into five categories. MFW p. 539 “I Have a Dream” outline Dr. King’s speech into its div / class organization
MFW p. 546 “Building Baby From the Genes Up” Green classifies the multiple concerns of genetic manipulations.
MFW p. 552 “In Praise of the F Word” Sherry classifies the many benefits of giving lowperforming students a failing grade.
MFW p. 303 "Figurative Language" Brings freshness and color to your writing.
IMPORTANT CONCEPTS:
*Division / Classification is a logical method of thinking which allows us to make sense of our world.
*Division takes a single unit or concept, breaks it down to smaller parts, and then analyzes the connection among the parts and the whole. There are usually many different ways to divide a subject – but use only one.
*Classification brings two or more related items together and categories them according to type or kind, making unwieldy groups into manageable topics, (like classified ads).
*Divide= a single apple. Classify= different types of apples. And WHY?
*Brainstorm to find, and then use specific examples in your own writing.
*Apply the principle of division or classification logically and consistently. Subjects should be mutually exclusive (no gaps or overlaps). Outlining should help.

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*You can use figurative language to enrich reader understanding.
ACTIVITIES TO PRACTICE WRITING SKILLS:
MFW p. 472 "Activity Using Div./ Class. "
MFW p. 447 #3
MFW p. 316 "Activity Using Figurative Language"
MFW p. 310 "Activity Using Figurative Language" (simile and metaphor)
MFW p. 130 "Activity Using Organization”

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ASSIGNMENT #5: DIVISION & CLASSIFICATION ESSAY
Write about 3-4 pages using division / classification writing techniques to discuss a topic of your choice. Do not number your categories. Instead, use clear transition sentences to signal a change. Your introduction or thesis is likely to include the reason why this type of sorting is helpful or relevant. What should the audience learn or understand after reading? Remember that coherent division / classification uses lots of examples: general and specific, concrete examples.
Use the present tense and the pronoun “I” (not “you”) in your writing. When revising, include some figurative language to further enhance reader comprehension. Title your work.
Underline your thesis.
Topic Ideas for

Division or
A Car
A Friend
A Recreational activity
A Sport
A Driver
A Student
A Pet peeve

Classification:
Cars
Friends
Recreational Activities
Sports
Drivers
Students
Pet Peeves
My Music / Book Collection
An excellent / horrible waiter / cashier / teacher / boss
Waiters / cashiers / teachers . . .

My division / classification will be about: _____________________________________
Dividing or classifying my topic this way teaches me this important lesson:
___________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
When you have completed Assignment #5, Division Classification, please complete the
Writer’s Checklist for personal use. Revise the assignment after reflecting on the checklist.
Submit the work to the instructor via email, fax, or land mail.

REQUEST THE FINAL EXAM FROM THE EXTENDED STUDIES OFFICE USING
THE FORM IN THE STUDY GUIDE.

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GUIDELINES FOR PROCTORED EXAMS

1.

Please send your exam request form two to three weeks before you plan to take the exam to:
Extended Studies
Adams State University
208 Edgemont Blvd., Suite 3000
Alamosa, CO 81101
2. No more than one exam may be taken on the same day, therefore multiple exams will not be sent together.
3. Exams may not be sent to or taken at a residential address.
4. The main requirement of a proctor is the willingness to preserve the academic integrity of the examination. To avoid a conflict of interest, the student shall not propose his/her relative, immediate work supervisor, co-worker, athletic administrator, athletic coach or assistant coach as a proctor. The following is a list of acceptable proctors:  Elementary or secondary school superintendents, principals, teachers or guidance counselors
 Professional employees of accredited post-secondary colleges or universities, who do not teach, advise or coach the student.
 Professionals working for the public or private libraries
 Commissioned officers of the active duty military, National Guard or Reserve Components
 Clergy
 Military Education, College Continuing Education or Distance Learning Staff
 Human Resource and Training Managers/Directors
5. Adams State University reserves the right to verify a proctor’s identity, require additi onal proof of eligibility, or require the selection of a different proctor.
6. The following instructions will be sent to the approved proctor to ensure proper testing conditions:
Before the exam:
Arrange a time for the students to take the exam.
Carefully read the cover letter sent with the exam and ensure the directions are clear.
Ask the student to show identification if you do not know him/her.
Instruct the student of any specifics pertaining to the exam. Information about the use of notes, texts, or calculators can be found on the examination sheet.
Administering the exam:
Find a quiet area where the exam may be taken with little distraction.
Allow the student to bring in only those materials needed for the exam.
Set a watch or timer for the exact amount of time allotted for the exam. When the time expires, collect the exam from the student whether he/she is finished or not.
Following the exam:
Complete all proctor forms, including signature of this exam certificate.
Make a copy of the completed exam for your files, in the event the exam may get lost in the mail. Please destroy this copy after 30 days. Do not make a copy for the student.
Mail the exam and proctor forms in the envelope provided. The student should provide postage. Do not allow the student to mail the exam him/herself. Examinations may not be faxed.
Do not read or discuss the exam with the student.
If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Extended Studies at 1(800)548-6679. Our office hours are 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday thru Friday. Summer hours are 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (MST)
Adams State University Extended Studies
208 Edgemont Boulevard, Suite 3000 • Alamosa, CO 81101 • Fax: 719.587.7974 • Phone: 719.587.7671
Toll-free: 800.548.6679 • Email: ascextend@adams.edu• Website: http://www2.adams.edu/extended_studies

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EXAMINATION REQUEST
Please send this Examination Request only after all preceding assignments have been sent to the instructor for evaluation. Do not include assignments with this request; send the request separately or fax to:
Extended Studies
Adams State University
208 Edgemont Blvd., Suite 3000
Alamosa, CO 81101
Fax: (719) 587-7974
Name of Student: ______________________________________________________________
Address: _____________________________________________________________________
E-Mail: ____________________________ Date examination is to be taken: ______________
EXAMINATION REQUESTED: FINAL EXAM
ENG 101 COMMUNICATION ARTS I - INSTRUCTOR: ELLEN SIMPSON NOVOTNY
TIME LIMIT: 3 HRS., OPEN BOOK, OPEN NOTES

THIS SECTION TO BE COMPLETED BY PROPOSED PROCTOR
Proposed Proctor’s Name: ______________________________________________________
Title: ____________________Company/Organization:_______________________________
Mailing Address: ______________________________________________________________
Email:_____________________________ Phone Number: (____) ______________________
I attest that my relationship to the above-named student does not present a conflict of interest. I attest that I am not a relative, immediate work supervisor, co-worker, athletic administrator, coach, or assistant coach of the above-named student. I agree to adhere to the guidelines for proctoring the exam for the above-named student and will certify that the exam was administered in accordance with the instructions supplied to me with the exam. I understand that the exam will be mailed to my attention, and I will ensure that the exam is held confidential before, during, and after it is administered to the student and will return the exam to the instructor in the envelope provided with the exam.
_________________________________________
Proctor’s Signature

______________________
Date

Adams State University reserves the right to verify a proctor’s identity, require additional proof of eligibility, or require the selection of a different proctor.
FOR OFFICE USE ONLY
Date Exam Mailed: _______________
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COMPARISON / CONTRAST

MFW Chapter 19

RECOMMENDED READING:
MFW "Comparison and Contrast" Chapter 19 Pages 474 - 500
MFW p.479 "Two Ways of Seeing a River" Notice Twain’s different perceptions of the
SAME river at different times in his life (before and after his career piloting a steamboat). Notice his organization, use of analogy in paragraph 3, details, figurative language.
MFW p.484 "Some Lessons From the Assembly Line" Braaksma contrasts his summer job to college life from many different angles.
MFW p. 126 “Two Ways to Belong In America” Consider Mukherjee’s insight into cultural contrasts. MFW p. 489 “Grant and Lee: A Study in Contrasts” Notice how Catton considers the two
Civil War majors from many different angles: background, personality, and underlying aspiration.
IMPORTANT CONCEPTS:
*We note similarities and differences every day, then use c/c to impose meaning on our lives and help us make choices.
*C / C demands logical thinking and clear organization: emphatic, one-side-at-a-time
(discuss all points for side A, then all points for side B, when uncomplicated) or point-bypoint (discuss point A for both sides, then discuss point B for both sides, etc., when subjects are complex)
*C / C can used 4 ways: to present info (informative), reach a conclusion or make a judgment (evaluation), convince reader to agree with your opinion, take action, or propose a change (persuasion), or to make a complex subject easier to understand by using an imaginative comparison (an analogy) that delves beneath the surface, to expose unsuspected similarities or differences (i.e.: national debt c/c household budget).
*Present a clear thesis, select points to be discussed, consider purpose and audience
*Connect each point or criteria to the thesis
*DO NOT focus on the obvious . . . lots of brainstorming will garner new ideas
*Remember C/C is a means to an end - -that end is to open up a subject for exploration, providing NEW ways of thinking about that subject (not rote listings of familiar information).
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ACTIVITIES TO PRACTICE WRITING SKILLS:
MFW p. 440, 449, 455, 461 “Activity Using Comparison / Contrast”
Try the brainstorming, writing a thesis, and outlining these!
You are welcome to send me the practice work to receive more feedback before you write.
FINAL EXAM ASSIGNMENT will read like this:
COMPARISON / CONTRAST ESSAY, W/ THESIS
Write about 3-4 pages (750 - 1000 words) using the comparison and/or contrast method of development to discuss a topic of your choice. Remember that coherent comparison / contrast uses a clear thesis statement. The thesis will be one or two sentences long, identifying your attitude toward the topic and the elements or criteria to be discussed. Be certain to illustrate your discussion by presenting your topic of comparison or contrast from many different angles.
Use the present tense and the pronoun “I” (not “you”) in your writing. When revising, work for an interesting introduction that draws the reader into your world. As a final revision, to further develop your comparison / contrast coherence, try to outline your essay, then revise to balance the various outline elements. Combine choppy sentences. Use a title. Underline your thesis.
Comparison / Contrast Topic Ideas:
Two approaches to studying or cleaning or parenting
Two attitudes toward money or music or pizza
Walking or biking versus driving a car
Life then versus life now (like Twain) (attitudes toward a person or game or event)
A character in a novel versus the same character in the movie version
Two different bosses or grandparents or siblings or friends
Your expectations of an event versus reality
Two essays in the textbook which consider the same topic
I will compare / contrast: _____________________ to ________________________ on these criteria:
1. __________________________________
2. __________________________________
3. __________________________________
4. __________________________________
What I/we learn by comparing or contrasting these two elements is:
______________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
I will organize: point –by-point or one-side-at-a-time
When you have completed your studying for Comparison / Contrast, take the proctored essay exam.

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ASSIGNMENT 7:

FINAL EXAM – PROCTORED ESSAY – COMPARISON /
CONTRAST ESSAY WITH THESIS. OPEN BOOK, OPEN NOTES.

After the instructor informs the student of the final exam grade and overall grade, it is then submitted to the Extended Studies Office. The grade must also be processed by the Records
Office. Please allow 5-10 business days for the grade to be posted to your official transcript.
Call the toll-free number with any further questions.

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~ Computing My English 101 Score ~
Assignment
#
Topic

My
Points

Possible
Points

Total
Points

_____

100

100

2– Process Analysis Essay

_____

100

200

3 – Thesis Practice Assignment

_____

100

300

4 – Argumentation / Illustration Essay

_____

200

500

5 – Division / Classification Essay

_____

200

700

6 - Revision of any essay

_____

50

750

7 - Revision of any essay

_____

50

800

8 - Final Exam – Proctored Essay

_____

200

1000

Self Introduction
1 – Description

Writing

* Divide the score you earned by the points possible to figure the score for one essay.
For example: 82/100 = 82% = B* To compute your score in the overall course, add all the points you’ve earned. Divide that by the total of all the points possible for the assignments you’ve attempted.
For example: 82 + 86 + 85 + 150 = 403 (points earned)
100+ 100+ 100 + 200 = 500 (points attempted)
403 / 500 = 81% = B-

Grading:

90-100% = A, 80-89% = B, 70-79% = C, 60-69% = D, below 60% = F

See Also:

Definition of Letter Grades

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Definitions of Letter Grades
A. The “A" paper shows originality of thought in stating and developing a central theme or idea.
Its ideas are clear, logical, and thought provoking; it contains all the positive qualities of good writing listed below: 1) Careful construction and organization of sentences and paragraphs. 2) Careful choice of effective words and phrases. 3) Concentration on a main purpose, with adequate development and firm support.
B. The "B" paper has a clearly individual insight or tone and a clearly stated purpose, logically and adequately developed. Its ideas are clear because it contains some positive qualities of good writing. It is comparatively free from errors in the use of English. Although indicating imaginative competence, the "B" paper lacks the reinforcing qualities of mechanics and style which characterize the “A" paper.
C. The average paper will receive a "C" grade. It has a central idea organized clearly enough to convey its purpose to the reader. It avoids serious errors in the use of English. It may, in fact, have few marks on it, but it lacks the vigor of thought and expression which would entitle it to above average rating.
D. The grade of "D" indicates below average achievement in conceiving and expressing ideas correctly and effectively. Most "D" papers contain serious errors in the use of grammar and fail to present a central idea or to develop it adequately. With more careful proofreading, fuller development, and more perceptive observation. "D" papers might clearly receive a higher mark.
F. The grade of "F” may indicate failure to conceive, state, and develop a main idea. It may also indicate failure to avoid serious errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation, and sentence structure. Papers containing several serious mechanical errors may not be accepted by the instructor until adequate revision is completed.

(SDSU – 2002)

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WRITER’S RESOURCES AND CHECKLISTS

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What’s new in MLA style?
The Modern Language Association (MLA) has updated its guidelines for college and high school writers. What follows is an overview of the major changes in MLA style in the 7th edition of the
MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (2009).
Italics
Italics is now used everywhere in place of underlining—for titles, for words, etc.
Medium of publication medium of publication designation, such as the following: Print, Web,
Radio, Television, CD, Audiocassette, Film, Videocassette, DVD, Performance, Lecture, and
PDF file.
Wood, James. How Fiction Works. New York: Farrar, 2008. Print.
Issue numbers for journals paginated by issue. All entries must have both volume and issue numbers for all journals.
Wood, Michael. “Broken Dates: Fiction and the Century.” Kenyon Review 22.3
(2000): 50-64. Print.
Online sources author, title, or other identifying information in a search engine or a database. Consequently,
MLA does not require a URL in citations for online sources. sponsor or publisher for most online sources. If a source has no sponsor or publisher, use the abbreviation “N.p.” (for “No publisher”) in the sponsor position. no date of publication or update, use “n.d.” (for “no date”) after the sponsor. page numbers if they are available; if they are not, use the abbreviation “n. pag.”
Web site
Margaret Sanger Papers Project. History Dept., New York U, 18 Oct. 2000. Web.
9 Feb. 2009.
Article on a Web site (no date)
Shiva, Vandana. “Bioethics: A Third World Issue.” NativeWeb. NativeWeb, n.d.
Web. 22 Feb. 2006.
Article from a database
Johnson, Kirk. “The Mountain Lions of Michigan.” Endangered Species Update
19.2 (2002): 27-31. Expanded Academic Index. Web. 26 Feb. 2009.

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In-text citations stly Web sites), don’t use a paragraph or section number
(with “par.” or “sec.”) unless the source itself numbers its paragraphs or sections.
© Bedford/St. Martin's 2009

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USING MLA STYLE CITATIONS IN WRITING
Use the MLA section of A Writer’s Reference
1. Signal the beginning and end of quotations and paraphrases by using both AUTHOR’S
LAST NAME and PAGE NUMBER for EVERY borrowed set of words.
(MLA format does not use p / pg/ pgs. MLA format does not use the year).
2. Use quotation marks around borrowed words, use [brackets] around any words you insert for clarity within the quote.
3. Place period (or connecting comma) after final parenthetical mark.
4. Alter initial capitals in some quoted material if it flows smoothly into your text.
5. Use ellipsis points to omit portions of quoted matter: see WR
6. Quotes of more than 4 typed lines are handled differently: see WR
BLENDING QUOTES SMOOTHLY INTO YOUR OWN WRITING
NOTE: There are various ways to lead into a quote. Always introduce a quote by providing explanation before the quote and discussion linking the quote to your point after the quote.
Signal Phrase at the Beginning:
According to Colombo, the myth of individual opportunity “is the engine that drives the
American dream” (135).
Signal Phrase at the Middle:
“History complicates the myth of [individual opportunity]. [Success] can bind as effectively as it can liberate; it can enforce conformity,” according to Colombo, “and limit life chances as well as foster individual” opportunity (138).
Signal Phrase at the End:
The myth of individual opportunity “is the engine that drives the American dream,” according to Colombo (135).
No Signal Phrase - Entirely Parenthetical Reference to Author:
The myth of individual opportunity “is the engine that drives the American dream”
(Colombo 135).
Note – if you decide to paraphrase an original source, you still MUST give credit where credit is due. All the same signal phrasing options exist; the only difference is that you do not use quotation marks since you are only borrowing ideas, not words. When in doubt – just QUOTE the original and use the appropriate citations systems.

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For stronger signal phrases, use many different synonyms for “says”: explains insists declares hints clarifies contends illustrates implores lists argues interprets claims complains begs finds advises demands theorizes describes cautions

apologizes attacks cheers briefs outlines . . .

Creating the label for the first page:
(All double spaced – top left corner of page – not in running header)
Student Name
ASU English 101
17 March 2011
Instructor Novotny
Assignment #5 – Division / Classification
Creating the running head in MS Word:
After typing your document, Select / Click
Insert
Page Numbers
Position:
Top of Page
Alignment: Right
Click OK and close. This returns you to your document.
On your document
Double click on faint number “1”
Type your last name and a space in front of the number on page 1
(May have to click right alignment before typing name)
See Also: the sample paper in the MLA section of your handbook

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Food Topics
Since you are interested in food / cooking, write all your essays about those topics! Describe one mouthful of your favorite dessert or food.
Tell the process of how to make your favorite recipe.
Argue that nothing compares to the healthfulness of a home-cooked meal . . .or argue that your mom’s hot cocoa is the best . . . Or argue that healthful food can still be very tasty following a few basic tips. . . .or that restaurant “x” is the best.

. . And here are 3 reasons why.

Divide / classify the parts of one excellent meal / or one excellent restaurant / or the skills of one excellent chef.
Basketball topic ideas –
You may write all your essays about basketball if you want –
DESCRIBE the hoop or the ball or the team locker room
ANALYZE THE PROCESS or steps needed for a successful free-throw / or a lay-up.
ILLUSTRATE / exemplify several skills / statistics of key players on two different teams-- then
ARGUE, based on those statistics why team x is better than team y.
DIVIDE a bb team into its parts, describing the tasks / jobs of each part and why each part is important (for example, because if the water assistant fails, then the team will be so thirsty, they might faint).

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When you have completed Assignment #1, Description, please complete the Writer’s
Checklist for personal use. Revise the assignment after reflecting on the checklist. Submit the work to the instructor via e-mail, fax, or land mail.
ASSIGNMENT #1 - DESCRIPTION – SHORT WRITING
WRITER’S CHECKLIST
_____ My completed assignment is 1-2 paragraphs (no more than 250 words)
_____ I used description as the primary method to develop my writing topic
_____ My topic describes a person _____

a place _____

a thing _____

_____ I used an interesting title
_____ I used vivid details
_____ The details appeal to the reader’s sense of sight, sound, touch, taste, smell
_____ I attempted to create a single, dominant impression
_____ I followed the MLA guidelines as described in WR “Manuscript Format”
_____ I used Standard English
_____ I used varied sentence structure
_____ I used strong verbs
_____ I used figurative language (a simile, a metaphor, imagery)
_____ I used “I” (not “you”) in my description

My dominant impression is:

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When you have completed Assignment #2, Process Analysis essay, please complete the
Writer’s Checklist for personal use. Revise the assignment after reflecting on the checklist.
Submit the work to the instructor via email, fax, or land mail.
ASSIGNMENT #2 – PROCESS ANALYSIS ESSAY
WRITER’S CHECKLIST
_____ My complete assignment is 2-3 pages (500 - 750 words)
_____ I use process analysis as the primary method to develop my writing topic
_____ The introduction engages reader interest and clarifies context (who, what, where. . )
_____ I conclude my essay in an interesting way.
_____ I show the reader WHY understanding this process is important
_____ I divide the process into clear steps
_____ I use logical transitions to keep the reader with me as I move through the process
_____ Using concrete, show-me-don’t tell-me details, I help the reader walk in my shoes
_____ Each step includes plenty of descriptive details to help the reader understand
_____ I use strong verbs to bring this process to life
_____ I follow the MLA guidelines as described in WR “Manuscript Format”
_____ I use Standard English
_____ I use the effective sentence techniques
_____ I use an interesting title
_____ I use “I” (not “you”) in my

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When you have completed Assignment #4, Argumentation / Illustration essay with thesis, please complete the Writer’s Checklist for personal use. Revise the assignment after reflecting on the checklist. Submit the work to the instructor via email, fax, or land mail.
ASSIGNMENT #4 – ARGUMENTATION / ILLUSTATION ESSAY WITH THESIS
WRITER’S CHECKLIST
_____ My complete assignment is 3-4 pages (750 - 1000 words)
_____ I use argumentation and illustration as my primary methods of development
_____ I begin the essay with an interesting title and an intriguing introduction & thesis
_____ My thesis statement is 1-2 sentences long, and is underlined.
_____ states my slant on the topic,
_____ and presents three or more of the most interesting criteria to be discussed
_____ I use vivid, concrete details, helping the reader really understand me
_____ I use figurative language (a simile or a metaphor) to enhance reader understanding
_____ I include transitions which help create a logical organization
_____ I use words and phrases which clearly link each criteria to the thesis
_____ I use the effective sentence techniques, including strong verbs, to create a voice
_____ I follow the MLA guidelines as described in WR “Manuscript Format”
_____ I use Standard English
_____ If I used outside sources, I gave credit by using in-text citations and a works cited
_____ I use facts, data, examples, anecdotes, illustrations, and expert opinions as support
_____ I refute any major objections the opposing side may offer
_____ I conclude forcefully, and offer a belief or action I want the reader to take

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When you have completed Assignment #5, Division Classification, please complete the
Writer’s Checklist for personal use. Revise the assignment after reflecting on the checklist.
Submit the work to the instructor via email, fax, or land mail.
ASSIGNMENT #5 – DIVISION / CLASSIFICATION ESSAY WITH THESIS
WRITER’S CHECKLIST
_____ My complete assignment is 3-4 pages (750 - 1000 words)
_____ I use division / classification as the primary method to develop my writing topic
_____ I begin the essay with an interesting title and an intriguing introduction & thesis
_____ My thesis statement is 1-2 sentences long, and is underlined
_____ states my slant on the topic,
_____ and presents three or more criteria to be discussed
_____ I discuss the most interesting criteria for my div/class. (not obvious)
_____ I use vivid, concrete details, helping the reader really understand this div. / class.
_____ I create an overall voice by carefully selecting details, words, and structures
_____ I include transitions which help create a logical organization for my div. / class.
_____ I clearly link each div. / class. criteria to the thesis
_____ I follow the MLA guidelines as described in WR “Manuscript Format”
_____ I use Standard English
_____ I use strong verbs, figurative language, and a variety of sentencing techniques
_____ I avoid using “you” in my division / classification essay
_____ I present an interesting summary for the reader and clarify what is learned

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FINAL EXAM PREPARATION – COMPARISON / CONTRAST ESSAY WITH THESIS
WRITER’S CHECKLIST
_____ My complete assignment is 3-4 pages (750 - 1000 words)
_____ I use comparison / contrast as the primary method to develop my writing topic
_____ I begin the essay in an interesting title and an intriguing introduction & thesis
_____ My thesis statement is 1-2 sentences long, and is underlined
_____ states my slant on the topic,
_____ and presents three or more criteria to be discussed
_____ I discuss the most interesting criteria for my c /c (not obvious)
_____ I use vivid, concrete details, helping the reader really understand me
_____ I create an overall voice by carefully selecting details, words, and structures
_____ I include transitions which help create a logical organization for my c / c
_____ I clearly link each criteria to the thesis
_____ I follow the MLA guidelines as described in WR “Manuscript Format”
_____ I use Standard English
_____ I use strong verbs, figurative language, and a variety of sentencing techniques
_____ I avoid using “you” in my comparison / contrast essay
_____ I present an interesting summary for the reader and clarify what is learned
_____ If I used outside sources, I gave credit by using in-text citations and a works cited

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Notes:

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Notes:

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ENG 101 – COMMUNICATION ARTS I
ADAMS STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENDED STUDIES STUDENT RATING
OF INSTRUCTION
Please evaluate all of your classes upon completion. The course evaluations provide feedback toward course improvement, faculty evaluation, and course development. You may return your completed evaluation via
USPS or fax, or you may complete an evaluation at following website: courseevaluation.adams.edu

Independent Study Course Information
Course: ENG 101 Communication Arts I

Instructor: Ellen Novotny

Directions: Please circle the number with your response to the each of the statements below
Scale:
Strongly Agree = 5 Agree = 4
Neutral = 3 Disagree = 2 Strongly Disagree = 1
Instructor Items:
SA
1. The instructor was enthusiastic about teaching this course.
5
2. The instructor’s explanations were clear.
5
3. The instructor was knowledgeable in the subject area.
5
4. The instructor encouraged me to learn.
5
5. The instructor was generally accessible.
5
Course Items:
SA
6. Course materials were well prepared.
5
7. My knowledge of course subject matter increased significantly.
5
8. The course met its objectives as published in the syllabus.
5
9. The basis (grading scheme) for evaluating my performance was clear.
5
Student Items:
SA
10. I was encouraged to actively participate in this course.
5
11. I actively participated (e.g. asked questions, corresponded with the
5
instructor) in this course.
All
Most
Assignment Completion:
Completed Completed
12.My degree of assignment completion (including reading assignments) was:
Course Interest:

A
4
4
4
4
4
A
4
4
4
4
A
4
4

N
3
3
3
3
3
N
3
3
3
3
N
3
3

D
2
2
2
2
2
D
2
2
2
2
D
2
2

SD
1
1
1
1
1
SD
1
1
1
1
SD
1
1

Half
Completed

Less than
Half
Completed

Few
Completed

High

Above
Average

Average

Below
Average

None

A

B

C

D

F

SA
5

A
4

N
3

D
2

SD
1

13.My interest level toward this course was:
Grade Expectation:
14. What grade do you expect to get for this course?
Course Delivery Method:
15. The facilities and/or technology were adequate for the course.

Comments: If additional space is needed, please use the back of this form.
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________

Adams State University—Extended Studies©

Page 49 of 50

May 2011

ENG 101 – COMMUNICATION ARTS I

Adams State University—Extended Studies©

Page 50 of 50

May 2011

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