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Common Sense By Thomas Paine

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Common Sense By Thomas Paine
In Thomas Paine's most influential text, “Common Sense,” he writes “From the errors of other nations, let us learn wisdom” (Paine 1776). Even as a recent immigrant, Paine was able to look beyond his own biased views and give a voice to the thousands of Americans that felt alienated by the British tyranny. The revolutionary pamphlet “Common Sense” was cheaply produced and distributed to the masses. Than again when the colonist seemed to have no hope of winning the war against the British, Paine writes up “Crisis” papers to inspire the troops to fight. Paine’s literary masterpieces unified the colonists and spark revolution across the colonies, as it puts to words what most people are feeling at this time. Thomas Paine is born in England on January 29th 1737, his father, a Quaker, gives him a basic education. For much of his early life he is unsuccessful in business, and he ends up working as a tax collector. In the summer of 1772, Paine publishes his first political work, “The Case of the Officers of Excise.” In this work he argues “ The mechanic and the laborer may in a great measure ward off the distress by raising the price of their manufactures or their work, but the situation of the officers …show more content…
Washington realizes he must do something to encourage his men to fight one last battle, an all or nothing gamble. Paine writes a document known as “The American Crisis,” and Washington orders his officers to read it allowed to every man in the army. As officers read out Paine’s words, like “Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph,” the men begin to muster the strength to fight (Paine 1776). A few days later the Continental Army has a win under its belt and the tables seem to be turning in their favor. Paine’s words once again prove to be a powerful force in the

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