Commercialization of organ transplants

Better Essays
Commercialization of Organ Transplants

I. Introduction:

The following report contains a summary of the arguments for and against the commercialization of transplants found in the research. Formulation on the position of which the debate of whether or not the sale of organs should be permitted is presented. There is the defense of moral judgment with a moral argument along with the identification of the moral principle that is appealing to the moral argument. Followed by, the normative theory that best supports the conclusion. Determination of the considerations for and the process of ethical business decision making to balance corporate and social responsibilities and address moral, economic, and legal concerns are presented. Analysis selected business situations using the predominant ethical theories, such as utilitarian, Kantian, and virtue ethics to guide ethical business decision making are also addressed.
II. Summary of the Arguments For and Against the Commercialization of Transplants Found in the Research: Summary of arguments for the commercialization of transplant organs found in research would be to save lives of the people who are ailing with their own organs and need a transplant to keep on living. This point touches an ethical and emotional argument of who is worthy to receive treatment first. This of course, should not be the case, since all individuals have the right to live no matter what status or economic level they find themselves. One very unfair argument is famous actors or singers receive transplant organs first, while others wait for a long time or die waiting in the process. (Coleman, 1996) Is this fair that just because they have a better status or are wealthier they are bumped up and are given priority? For example, both Larry Hagman (actor) and David Crosy(singer) from”Crosby, Stills & Nash”only waited a couple of weeks for a new liver. Is it ethical for celebrities to cut ahead of the line?



References: Coleman, P. (1996). “Brother Can You Spare a Liver?” Five Ways to Increase Organ Donation, Valparaiso University Law Review,31 (1) 1. Shaw, W. H. (2011).  Business ethics: A textbook with cases. (7th ed.). Mason, Ohio: Cengage Learning. NPTrust. (2013, November 07). Charitable giving statistics. Retrieved from http://www.nptrust.org/philanthropic-resources/charitable-giving-statistics Wisegeek. (2013, November 07). What are basic business theories. Retrieved from http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-basic-business-ethics-theories.htm

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Better Essays

    I’ve recently done research regarding the commercialization of Organ Transplants. I’ve found many arguments for and against this subject. Some individuals find the act to be unethical, and other’s think it will save lives. The problem is that a new policy was proposed to allow sale of organs by consenting individuals to patients in need and to medical institutions. When it comes to the subject of human organs, there are a few ethical standards to consider. There are religious standards, social norms, ethical code, morals, and policies in which we should follow. Critics argue that permitting organs to be bought and sold is unethical. Meaning that to commercialize organs transplants would violate an ethical code and social norm.…

    • 1389 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Compensating donors for organ donations is one of the most controversial debates we have today. The shortage of organ donations in America is the one of the main reason there is a sudden drive to supplement the possible sources of organs. It first began with the move from donations of organs from cadaver to donations from living donors, and no the debate is rerisen, to the possibility of building a market for organ donations with a financial incentive.…

    • 949 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    In modern medicine societies, organ transplantation is an opportunity to save peoples’ lives. The downside of organ transplantation is that the demand for organs outweighs the supply. This becomes morally challenging in the context for those who participate in a market as a solution due to the lack of available organs. A market is the selling of organs, which is an unlawful practice in many parts of the world. It is a transaction between those who are seeking for organs to arrange with brokers, and procure organs from those who exist in impoverished, underdeveloped countries. An effort to increase the organ pool is to offer a financial inducement for the organ vendors. The ethical issue of this strategy is that donors no longer participate for altruistic reasons but decide to become vendors, for financial purposes, which means to partake in a commodity for material gain.…

    • 1544 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    organs will save lives

    • 911 Words
    • 3 Pages

    In the essay “Organ Sales Will Save Lives” by Joanna MacKay, kidney failure is the main topic. In her thesis, MacKay states that, “Governments should not ban the sale of human organs; they should regulate it (92).” The thesis is supported by one main reason: it will save lives. In America 350,000 people struggle each year from this situation. MacKay also states that with the legal selling of organs, more people will be willing to give up their kidneys. There are also other ways to save lives like dialysis, but this situation would only be for a temporary time period, transplant is definitely the way to go. People in third world countries are extremely willing to sell their kidneys because they need the money (94). MacKay points out that there is a black market for selling kidneys for $150,000 because it is illegal to sell organs in many countries (93). The broker who arranges the sale, takes advantage of uneducated poor people who are in desperate need of money, only paying them around $1,000 for a kidney (93). People around the world also donate kidneys from the good of their heart; these people have very good moral reasoning’s. She then goes on to talk about the pros and cons of this transplant and how everybody gains except the patient. The workers in the hospitals are paid to do the operation, the person who needs the kidney walks away with one, and the donor is left with nothing. The Government could also regulate this transaction to help make the donors receive money, this way there would be more kidneys up for grab. In her essay Mackay uses statistics and accurate evidence to get through to the readers how she feels about the cause and effect of this operation in modern day.…

    • 911 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Organ sales can lead to explotation if its not giving the right rules and regulations. Despite this fact organ shortage is growinn, legalization of sales will help so many in need of transplants. Rules should be extended to insurance companies having them pay certain fee for the organ which will give an equal opportunity to all people rich and poor. to receive a transplant.The writer has a good content. The essay presents a thesis that develops the proposal argument. It only needs further…

    • 84 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Organ donation for transplantation has become altruistic worldwide. All organ donations have become altruistic, meaning that there are no financial incentives to people who are willing to have their organs or organs of their deceased family members used for transplants. During the past two decades, advances in immunosuppressive therapy has led to greater success in transplantation and to increased numbers of patients on transplant waiting lists. Instead of donating organs people can start selling them it could potentially become as charitable as donating. People could gain a little cash from it. Besides that America has one of the highest waiting list besides China for organ transplants. There are not enough donations to extinguish the growing waiting list. The shortage of transplant organs is a major worldwide public health problem. According to the US Department of Health and Human Services Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network, there are approximately 123,000 patients on transplant waiting lists in the US and around 300,000 patients waiting for an organ transplant in China (The Economist…

    • 511 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Organs For Sale Summary

    • 1135 Words
    • 5 Pages

    “Organs for Sale” is an argument written in response to the on-going ethical debate of a market-based incentive program to meet the rising demands of organ transplants. With many on the waiting list for new organs and few organs being offered, the author, Sally Satel, urges for legalization of payment to organ donors. Once in need of a new kidney herself, Sally writes of the anguish she encountered while facing three days a week on dialysis and the long wait on the UNOS list with no prospective willing donors in sight. She goes on to list several saddening researched facts on dialysis patients survival rates, length of time on the UNOS wait list, and registered as well as deceased donor numbers. While Sally is…

    • 1135 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Cited: “CMA policy: Organ and tissue donation and transplantation (update 2000).” Canadian Medical Association. Journal 163.2 (2000): 206-208. ProQuest Science Journals,…

    • 1766 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    More than 100,000 men, women and children in need of life-saving organ transplants, every 10 minutes another person is added to the national organ transplant waiting list and averages of 18 people die each day from the lack of available organs. (donatelife.net) Organ transplants are very important because they replace the damaged organ and help the body function once again. There are still huge shortages of organs, even after awareness and other ways of educating the public. Some Americans are open to donating but many more are against it or unaware of the process which leaves many without organs and dying every day. The ongoing debate is whether to give financial incentives to organ donors to promote organ donation which would put a price on human parts but also save thousands more lives. The Government should give financial incentives to promote organ donation so as to save thousands of lives, to erode the black market and to better improve the flawed system we have today for organ transplant.…

    • 1590 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    In recent years, controversy has been arising over the idea of organ donors being given compensation to encourage donations. Critics state that it would be difficult and perplexing to regulate an organ market. Moreover, Americans today tend to believe that selling human organs is demeaning and can shape a world where the human body’s purpose is to make profit. Such publications have led officials to pass a law asserting that offering incentives to donors is a crime and illegal in the United States. However, there still are many benefits of donor compensation, such as rescuing lives and reducing the need for dialysis, which can be expensive. Although many may go against the idea of donor compensation, the idea is effective because it will save…

    • 633 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Commercialization of organ transplant can lead to health risks to the donor. People who are not fit to donate may offer to donate their organ for the monetary gains. This can result even in the death of the donor. Commercialization of organs may lead to loss of integrity and ethics in the society. People who are mentally unstable may be coerced to donate their organs. The rate of crime will also rise in the society. People will start killing each other so as to obtain the organs (Kanniyakonil, 2005). Commercialization of organs may lead to extortion of patients. This is in the case where an increase in the demand of a given…

    • 943 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    “The world-wide, critical shortage of human organs available for transplantation and advances in genetic engineering and in the immunology and biology of organ tissue rejection have renewed scientists’ interest in investigating xenotransplantation as potentially promising means to treat a wide range of human disorders” (UNESCO Courier). Ever since the early 1900’s, xenotransplantation, “animal to human transplant” (Mail Online), is still debatable to this day. Many patients vote they would not allow this procedure to take place, but there is still a very minuscule percentage that is willing to take on this drastic procedure. It is never known when an organ suitable for a patient will be available, especially with “at least 180 000 people around…

    • 1837 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Organ Shortage

    • 1884 Words
    • 8 Pages

    Organ transplantation is a term that most people are familiar with. When a person develops the need for a new organ either due to an accident or disease, they receive a transplant, right? No, that 's not always right. When a person needs a new organ, they usually face a long term struggle that they may never see the end of, at least while they are alive. The demand for transplant organs is a challenging problem that many people are working to solve. Countries all over the world face the organ shortage epidemic, and they all have different laws regarding what can be done to solve it. However, no country has been able to create a successful plan without causing moral and ethical dilemmas.…

    • 1884 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Hsc 525 Week 2

    • 1105 Words
    • 5 Pages

    One of the areas that is currently affecting the United States is the ethical issue of organ transplant allocation. Since the first single lung transplant in 1983 and then the first double lung transplant in 1986 there have been thousands of people who have lived because of the surgery. One must examine, evaluate, and apply the four ethical principles to Organ transplant allocation to look at the ethical issues involved. Once must look at the fact that not every patient who would benefit from a transplant will receive one in time since the number of patients in need is far higher than the available organs for transplant. Another part of the organ transplant allocation issue is when a rock star, sports hero. Politian or TV personality receives a transplant over the everyday person waiting on a transplant list. The ethical principles Autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice must be used within the organ transplant allocation.…

    • 1105 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Best Essays

    With organ transplants so prevalent in today’s society, it is important that the ethical issues surrounding them are fully understood. While many people want to see life extended as long as possible, there are others who believe life must be allowed to run its natural course. This literature review examines the process of organ transplantation from continuous shortages of available organs to the distribution process to the lasting effects of the transplant on the patient. The research showed that even as policies and procedures adapt to our evolving society, it is very likely there will always be disagreement on the subject of organ transplantation.…

    • 2472 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Best Essays

Related Topics