Top-Rated Free Essay

Commentary on a Passage from Cry, the Beloved Country.

Satisfactory Essays
e novel, Cry, the beloved country is written by Alan Paton, a great South African writer. The book was published in 1948 and became world wide bestseller. Alan Paton mainly discusses the struggle for Africa and especially the conflicts between the Whites and the Blacks in South Africa. He wants the people to realize that the destruction or breaking apart of a country like South Africa can be mended through hope and this hope can only be reached if people accept and love each other as fellow human beings. The Whites gained power through force and compulsion. The chosen passage shows Western style of thinking which lead to this particular destruction of South Africa. The passage illustrates a manuscript from Arthur Jarvis and is the last thing he wrote before he was shot by the natives. He described that the Christian civilization is "riddled through and through with dilemma". The manuscript by Arthur shows that although the Westerners have suppressed the natives and destroyed their culture, their own civilization is full of destruction and tragedy.

The Westerners think of themselves as superior and suppress the natives. From the passage it is shown that they deny giving education to the natives because they think that it would not help the country anyways. "We say we withhold education because the black child has not the intelligence to profit by it; we withhold opportunity to develop gifts because black people have no gifts." Arthur also describes: "We believe in help for the underdog, but we want him to stay under", which indicates their need to be superior. The word underdog even makes the natives inhumane. They describe them as underdogs, as animals, which is a really arrogant tone. Arthur also writes in his manuscript that the Westerners think, because they achieved their own advancement in a long period relationship.

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Cry, The Beloved Country Commentary Fear and Religion And now for all the people of Africa, the beloved country. Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika, God save Africa. But he would not see that salvation. It lay afar off, because men were afraid of it. Because, to tell the truth, they were afraid of him, and his wife, and Msimangu, and the young demonstrator. And what was there evil in their desires, in their hunger? That man should walk upright in the land where they were born, and be free to use the fruits…

    • 391 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Harold C. Gardiner, S.J. wrote a very interesting article entitled, "Critical Commentary." He wrote his essay in the year 1948. Throughout his work, his main idea is to praise the book, "Cry, the Beloved Country", written by Alan Paton. Gardiner is very satisfied with the book's subject matter of tension between Negroes and whites. For the first part of Gardiner's article he focuses on summarizing the novel. He explains that the book takes place in Southern Africa and he tells the reader…

    • 943 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Cry, the Beloved Country

    • 1871 Words
    • 8 Pages

    The book "Cry, the Beloved Country" by Alan Paton is a book about agitation and turmoil of both whites and blacks over the white segregation policy called apartheid. The book describes how understanding between whites and blacks can end mutual fear and aggresion, and bring reform and hope to a small community of Ndotcheni as well as to South Africa as a whole. The language of the book reflects the Bible; furthermore, several characters and episodes are reminiscent of stories from the New Testament…

    • 1871 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Cry Beloved Country

    • 415 Words
    • 2 Pages

    In Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton, he shows us a final moment when Kumalo goes to the top of a mountain overlooking East Griqualand. He then repents his sins, gives thanks for those who helped him, conducts a personal communion, then mourns the hanging of his son as the sun rises. Contrast and diction used by the author evoke an elegiac sentiment in the reader, and, moreover, creates an auspicious atmosphere. This passage acts as closure for the death of Absalom and, accordingly, the strife…

    • 415 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Cry, the Beloved Country

    • 1064 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Essay Question #2 It has been said that the land is itself another character in Paton's novel, Cry, the Beloved Country. What role does the landscape play in the novel? What does the valley surrounding Ndotsheni represent? "Keep it, guard it, care for it, for it keeps men, guards men, cares for men. Destroy it and man is destroyed" (Paton 33). In Cry, the Beloved Country, this bold statement reflects both the beauty of the land of South Africa and the peace and harmony of men. Both of their relations…

    • 1064 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Honors Literature 6th 9, September 2013 Cry of the Beloved Country Essay Cry of the Beloved Country is a book about courage. Two of the main characters, James Jarvis and Stephen Kumalo discover new things about their sons. While they both lost many things like relatives and trust, James Jarvis was the more courageous and advanced characters. James Jarvis was able to forgive and move on with the loss of his son and his wife. Jarvis develops in the way that he wants to devote his life to helping…

    • 787 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Cry, the Beloved Country

    • 622 Words
    • 3 Pages

    In the opening passage of Paton’s novel Cry, the Beloved Country, he shows us the beauty of South Africa through multiple biblical allusions with the majestic mountains, rolling hills, and low desolate valleys. Under all this beauty, the corruption of man comes to surface and destroys Gods’ perfect creation. The underlying meaning of this passage when broken down speaks of morals and how a persons’ take of society affects their moral character. With the use of biblical allusions and syntactical patterns…

    • 622 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Cry, the Beloved Country

    • 1291 Words
    • 6 Pages

    history. Native Americans highly valued the land. Al Gore’s speech on global warming taught that someday the resources are going to be gone and the Earth will turn against the people. In the novel, Cry, the Beloved Country, the reader can see that the land is going to be an essential part. Paton uses the country to represent many of the happenings that contribute to the journey of Kumalo. Paton describes the land as sacred. The belief of the people is that the land will always support them and in…

    • 1291 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Cry the Beloved Country

    • 2067 Words
    • 9 Pages

    Cry the Beloved Country When the earth’s humans were endowed with that spark of life, that intelligence that enabled them to plan ahead for the future generations of all of the creatures inhabiting the earth, and indeed even the very earth itself, only a few took up the challenge—they have since the “beginning” been the “People of the Earth”. Cry the Beloved Country is the story of some of those people who found themselves born to Africa. Alan Paton became their spokesperson the minute he wrote…

    • 2067 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Cry the Beloved Country

    • 460 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Cry, The Beloved Country "Cry, the beloved country, for the unborn child that is the inheritor of our fear. Let him not love the earth too deeply. Let him not laugh too gladly when the water runs through his fingers, nor stand too silent when the setting sun makes red the veld with fire. Let him not be too moved when the birds of his land are singing, nor give too much of his heart to a mountain or valley. For fear will rob him of all if he gives too much." Cry, the Beloved Country…

    • 460 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays