Coercion In Medical Ethics

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The first article about was about coercion. Criticism about informed consent is a common topic in research where implications of coercion seem present. Areas where these seem present include ethics consultations, presentations given at bioethics and medical conferences, and in ethics committee meetings. This essay's main argument was that the arguments for coercion are wrong in these instances. This speaks to authors topic of the essay in stating that the idea of coercion in medical research is not as prevalent as indicated in research ethical dilemmas and topics. Some arguments come from the fact that potential subjects may be poor, uneducated, naïve about research, and lacking alternative, nonresearch-related forms of health care. Commentators …show more content…
During the introduction, the reader learns of the patient who is a recent immigrant from Afghanistan that is 22 weeks pregnant. She is admitted to a non-teaching hospital with severe cramping. Upon having an ultrasound, it is found that there exist brain abnormalities with her fetus. The physician discovers that the fetus is afflicted with a relatively severe encephalocele that’s size and location makes survival outside the womb extremely …show more content…
The physician did not want to wait because he felt that he did not have time for this due to the other patients he needed to see. As a physician, being efficient and seeing the most number of patients helps him stay on track, however in care he must not be too unconscious of patient culture which plays a significant role in the overall health. Upon finally telling the family the results, the family wishes for the doctor to withhold the information from the mother for multiple reasons of which some are faith based. These reasons, being culture relevant, make it hard on a physician to make in moment decisions. However, the physician did make the right choice in informing the mother against the family's desires about her child's

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