Coastal Erosion at Happisburgh, Norfolk

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Coastal erosion at Happisburgh, Norfolk
Happisburgh, on Norfolk's North Sea coast, is a village with a population of 1400 people in about 600 houses. The village contains a notable stone church dating from the 14th century, an impressive manor house, listed buildings and a famous red and white striped lighthouse (Figure 1).
Although now a coastal village, Happisburgh was once some distance from the sea, parted from the coast by the parish of Whimpwell, long since eroded away. Historic records indicate that over 250 m of land were lost between 1600 and 1850.
Coastal defences built at Happisburgh have slowed down the rate of retreat. However, large sections are now in disrepair. Sea-level rise and climate change, including increased storminess, may also increase the rate of erosion.
Coastal erosion
It is likely that the Norfolk cliffs have been eroding at the present rate for about the last 5000 years when sea level rose to within a metre or two of its present position (Clayton, 1989). Therefore, the future predictions of sea level rise and storm frequency due to climate change are likely to have a profound impact on coastal erosion and serious consequences for the effectiveness of coastal protection and sea defence schemes in East Anglia in the near future (Thomalla and Vincent, 2003).
Rapid erosion of the cliffs at Happisburgh means that we can observe processes that for other sites may normally take thousands of years. This means that we can look for patterns in the erosion at Happisburgh, which may help our understanding of sites elsewhere that are eroding more slowly.

http://www.bgs.ac.uk/landslides/happisburgh.html
Blakeney National Nature Reserve

Blakeney lies just above high tide and as a result the area is already at risk from flooding. The nature reserve is a shingle spit behind which are salt marshes which are home to several species of breeding birds and common and grey seals.

East Head

East Head is a SSSI (Site of Special Scientific

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