Civil Right Movement In The Civil Rights Movement

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Civil Rights Movements in Alabama Segregation was a way of life in the South at the beginning of the Twentieth Century. Many people treated others terribly because the color of their skin and went on without it even fazing them, they all went on thinking it was okay, when it was not morally right. African Americans were treated horribly, almost as if they were not human. It was impossible to find any aspect of life unsegregated in the south. The Schools, restaurants, and even bathrooms were all segregated, and it was very evident in public transportation. Montgomery, Alabama played an important role in the American Civil Rights movement through their Jim Crow Laws, the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Freedom Rides, and the Sit-in Movements.
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Freedom Rides is a series of bus trips through the South to protest segregation in interstate bus terminals (History.com Staff). The 1961 Freedom Rides sought to test the 1960 decision by the Supreme Court in Boyton v. Virginia that segregation of interstate transportation (History.com Staff). The Freedom Rides were founded by a student group in Nashville, Tennessee (“African American History Month”). On May 4th, 1961, a group of African Americans and White Civil Rights activists launched the Freedom Rides (History.com Staff). Their plan was to reach New Orleans, Louisiana on March 17th, to commemorate the 7th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s decision in the Brown v. Board of Education case (History.com Staff). The group encountered much violence from White protesters, along their route but also gained much national attention. The Freedom Rides organised to test the validity and enforcement of their state (“African American History Month”). Many events happened involving the Freedom Riders that led to a more violent protest which was not the purpose of the …show more content…
The bus had planned to stop at the Anniston, Alabama station but passed when the driver saw the mob waiting for them (History.com Staff). When the mob saw them driving past they got in their cars and began to follow the bus, when the buses tires blew out the mob threw a bomb into the bus (History.com Staff). The riders of that bus escaped before the bus burst into flames, only to be beaten by the surrounding mob (History.com Staff). On May 20, the Freedom Rides were attacked by a local mob at the Montgomery Greyhound Bus Station in Montgomery, Alabama (“African American History Month”). The repercussions from this event brought the Civil Rights Movements struggle into “sharp relief and caught much national and international attention” (“African American History Month”). May 24th, 1961, the Freedom Riders left Montgomery from a different bus station, the Trailways Bus Station (“African American History Month”). The National Guard cornered the streets, providing protection for the group as they left for Mississippi, they were then later arrested in Jackson, MS (“African American History Month”). That was one of the last major events that lead to the end of

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